February 8: Poets

Day Williams created this graphic depiction of this date.
February 8
Poets

107.
They deem me mad because I will not sell my days for gold; and I deem them mad because they think my days have a price.
~Khalil Gibran (born Gubran Khalil Gubran, 1883–1931), Lebanese-American artist, poet, and writer. Born in the town of Bsharri in modern-day Lebanon (then part of the Ottoman Mount Lebanon mutasarrifate), as a young man he emigrated with his family to the United States where he studied art and began his literary career. He is chiefly known in the English-speaking world for his 1923 book The Prophet, an early example of inspirational fiction including a series of philosophical essays written in poetic English prose. Gibran is the third best-selling poet of all time, behind Shakespeare and Lao-Tzu.

108.
He who postpones the hour of living rightly is like the rustic who waits for the river to run out before he crosses.
~Horace. Quintus Horatius Flaccus (65 B.C.–8 B.C.), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus.

109.
Money is a handmaiden, if thou knowest how to use it; a mistress, if thou knowest not.
~HoraceMoney Matters.05b

February 8: Humor

Day Williams created this graphic depiction of this date.
February 8
Humor

107.
The truth of a proposition has nothing to do with its credibility. And vice versa.
~Robert A. Heinlein, Time Enough for Love (1973)

108.
Computer games don’t affect kids, I mean if Pac Man affected us as kids, we’d all be running around in darkened rooms, munching pills and listening to repetitive music.
~Marcus Brigstocke (falsely attributed to Kristian Wilson, Nintendo Inc.)

108.
Some people insist that “mediocre” is better than “best.” They delight in clipping wings because they themselves can’t fly. They despise brains because they have none. Pfah!
~Robert A. Heinlein, Have Space Suit—Will Travel (1958)

***

February 8: “Sestina: Blood Covenants,” a poem by Day Williams

 

Sestina: Blood Covenants

To make a wife for Adam, God spilled blood
By taking Adam’s rib, and Eden’s peace
Was sweet until they broke the law of God,
Who promised through another covenant
A seed to crush the serpent’s head. By faith
They left, the cherubim a flaming sign.

Adam Eve Cranach Elder

After the Flood, the rainbow was a sign.
God said to man, “Don’t eat your meat with blood
In it and do not kill,” so man by faith
In the Lord God Almighty would have peace
With Him and blessings in this covenant
Where Noah intervened for man with God.

Noah rainbow thank offering

Years later, Abraham was tried by God
Through sacrifice of Isaac as the sign
Of faith, the center of this covenant
In which in Isaac’s place a ram shed blood
As God commanded. Abraham gained peace
And blessings, for he showed unyielding faith.

After the plagues fell, Moses by his faith
Led the Israelites from Egypt, then God
Provided Ten Commandments that give peace
When followed, with the Sabbath Day a sign.
The Levites sacrificed the bulls, whose blood
Was confirmation of this covenant,

For blood must spill before a covenant
Will work. The Israelites, of faulty faith,
Failed to follow Mosaic law, and blood
Of bulls did not atone for sins. So God
Made David’s throne eternal, and the sign
Was the sun and the moon. Man failed, and peace

And land were lost to Roman rulers’ “peace.”
Now Israel had failed each covenant,
So God in grace and mercy gave a sign:
The virgin was with child. Not works, but faith
In Him would save a man, He taught, and God
Offered eternal life through Jesus’ blood.

I have sweet peace through Jesus Christ’s shed blood,
For man has a new covenant with God,

Dove Holy Spirit

The  Holy Spirit as the sign of faith.

~Day Williams, from Virginia Street and Other Poems

***

Day Williams reads his poem, “Sestina: Blood Covenants”

Aurora Nevada Crucifixion

A sestina (Old Occitan: cledisat [klediˈzat]; also known as sestine, sextine, sextain) is a fixed verse form consisting of six stanzas of six lines each, normally followed by a three-line envoi. The words that end each line of the first stanza are used as line endings in each of the following stanzas, rotated in a set pattern.

The invention of the form is usually attributed to 12th-century troubadour Arnaut Daniel; after spreading to continental Europe, it first appeared in English in 1579, though sestinas were rarely written in Britain until the end of the 19th century. It remains a popular poetic form, and many continue to be written by contemporary poets.

~Wikipedia

***

 

The Holy Ghost

Gives Christians verve,

While Christ gives love;

The Father, nerve.

~Day

February 8: Law and Lawyers: Humor

February 8
Humor  

 

107.

By Defendant’s Attorney:  Tell me what you were like from age 17 to the present. What have your feelings been about having kids?

By Plaintiff:  I wanted to pursue an education and then meet the perfect person and be married a couple years, save some money, buy a house, and start a family.

Defendant’s Attorney: When did that change?

Plaintiff:  Well—

By Plaintiff’s Attorney:  —or did that change?

By Plaintiff: It didn’t.

By Defendant’s Attorney: I think we all realize that as we get older, we’re not going to marry the perfect person.

By Plaintiff’s Attorney: My wife did.

 

108.

By Attorney: Officer, what led you to believe the defendant was under the influence?

By Witness:  Because he was argumentary and couldn’t pronunciate his words.