February 9: Drama and Television

Day Williams created this graphic depiction of this date.
February 9
Drama and Television

110.
Now look here, Smithers. They’s two kind’s of stealing. They’s the small kind, like what you does, and the big kind, like I does. Fo’ de small stealing dey put you in jail soon or late. But fo’ de big stealin’ dey puts your picture in de paper and yo’ statue in de Hall of Fame when you croak. If dey’s one thing I learned in ten years on de Pullman cars, listenin’ to de white quality talk, it’s dat same fact. And when I gits a chance to use it . . . from stowaway to emperor in two years. Dat’s goin’ some!
~Eugene O’Neill, The Emperor Jones (1920)

111.
If that ghost have money I tells him never to haunt you – less’n he wants to lose it!
~Eugene O’Neill, The Emperor Jones (1920)

Money Matters.05b

February 9: Physicists

Day Williams created this graphic depiction of this date.
February 9
Physicists

110.
The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them.
~Sir William Bragg. Sir William Henry Bragg (1862–1942) was a British physicist, chemist, mathematician and active sportsman who uniquely shared a Nobel Prize with his son William Lawrence Bragg − the 1915 Nobel Prize in Physics.

111.
We must not forget that when radium was discovered no one knew that it would prove useful in hospitals. The work was one of pure science. And this is a proof that scientific work must not be considered from the point of view of the direct usefulness of it. It must be done for itself, for the beauty of science, and then there is always the chance that a scientific discovery may become like the radium a benefit for humanity.
~Marie Curie. Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867–1934) was a Polish physicist and chemist, working mainly in France, who is famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the only woman to win in two fields, and the only person to win in multiple sciences. She was also the first female professor at the University of Paris (La Sorbonne), and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in Paris’ Panthéon.

February 9: “Conquered” by Dorothy Day

Out of the light that dazzles me,
Bright as the sun from pole to pole,
I thank the God I know to be,
For Christ–the Conqueror of my soul.

Since His the sway of circumstance,
I would not wince nor cry aloud.
Under the rule which men call chance,
My head, with joy, is humbly bowed.

Beyond this place of sin and tears,
That Life with Him and His the Aid,
That, spite the menace of the years,
Keeps, and will keep me unafraid.

I have no fear though straight the gate:
He cleared from punishment the scroll.
Christ is the Master of my fate!
Christ is the Captain of my soul!