February 9: Physicists

Day Williams created this graphic depiction of this date.
February 9
Physicists

110.
The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them.
~Sir William Bragg. Sir William Henry Bragg (1862–1942) was a British physicist, chemist, mathematician and active sportsman who uniquely shared a Nobel Prize with his son William Lawrence Bragg − the 1915 Nobel Prize in Physics.

111.
We must not forget that when radium was discovered no one knew that it would prove useful in hospitals. The work was one of pure science. And this is a proof that scientific work must not be considered from the point of view of the direct usefulness of it. It must be done for itself, for the beauty of science, and then there is always the chance that a scientific discovery may become like the radium a benefit for humanity.
~Marie Curie. Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867–1934) was a Polish physicist and chemist, working mainly in France, who is famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the only woman to win in two fields, and the only person to win in multiple sciences. She was also the first female professor at the University of Paris (La Sorbonne), and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in Paris’ Panthéon.