February 13: Dishonesty

February 13
Dishonesty

121.
“Do not use dishonest standards when measuring length, weight or quantity. Use honest scales and honest weights, an honest ephah and an honest hin. I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of Egypt. Keep all my decrees and all my laws and follow them. I am the LORD.’”
–Leviticus 19:35-36

122.
Wealth created by a lying tongue
is a vanishing mist and a deadly trap.
–Prov. 21:6

123.
For listen! Hear the cries of the field workers whom you have cheated of their pay. The wages you held back cry out against you. The cries of those who harvest your fields have reached the ears of the Lord of Heaven’s Armies. You have spent your years on earth in luxury, satisfying your every desire. You have fattened yourselves for the day of slaughter.
–James 5:4-5

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February 12: Honesty

Day Williams created this graphic depiction of this date.
February 12
Honesty

118.
The man replied to Joab, “Even if I had the weight of 1,000 pieces of silver in my hand, I would not raise my hand against the king’s son. For we heard the king command you, Abishai, and Ittai, ‘Protect the young man Absalom for me.’”
–2 Samuel 18:12

119.
Two things I ask of You;
don’t deny them to me before I die:
Keep falsehood and deceitful words far from me.
Give me neither poverty nor wealth;
feed me with the food I need.
Otherwise, I might have too much
and deny You, saying, “Who is the LORD?”
or I might have nothing and steal,
profaning the name of my God.
–Proverbs 30:7-9

120.
Then we will no longer be infants, tossed back and forth by the waves, and blown here and there by every wind of teaching and by the cunning and craftiness of people in their deceitful scheming. Instead, speaking the truth in love, we will grow to become in every respect the mature body of him who is the head, that is, Christ.
–Ephesians 4:14-15

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February 8: “Sestina: Blood Covenants,” a poem by Day Williams

 

Sestina: Blood Covenants

To make a wife for Adam, God spilled blood
By taking Adam’s rib, and Eden’s peace
Was sweet until they broke the law of God,
Who promised through another covenant
A seed to crush the serpent’s head. By faith
They left, the cherubim a flaming sign.

Adam Eve Cranach Elder

After the Flood, the rainbow was a sign.
God said to man, “Don’t eat your meat with blood
In it and do not kill,” so man by faith
In the Lord God Almighty would have peace
With Him and blessings in this covenant
Where Noah intervened for man with God.

Noah rainbow thank offering

Years later, Abraham was tried by God
Through sacrifice of Isaac as the sign
Of faith, the center of this covenant
In which in Isaac’s place a ram shed blood
As God commanded. Abraham gained peace
And blessings, for he showed unyielding faith.

After the plagues fell, Moses by his faith
Led the Israelites from Egypt, then God
Provided Ten Commandments that give peace
When followed, with the Sabbath Day a sign.
The Levites sacrificed the bulls, whose blood
Was confirmation of this covenant,

For blood must spill before a covenant
Will work. The Israelites, of faulty faith,
Failed to follow Mosaic law, and blood
Of bulls did not atone for sins. So God
Made David’s throne eternal, and the sign
Was the sun and the moon. Man failed, and peace

And land were lost to Roman rulers’ “peace.”
Now Israel had failed each covenant,
So God in grace and mercy gave a sign:
The virgin was with child. Not works, but faith
In Him would save a man, He taught, and God
Offered eternal life through Jesus’ blood.

I have sweet peace through Jesus Christ’s shed blood,
For man has a new covenant with God,

Dove Holy Spirit

The  Holy Spirit as the sign of faith.

~Day Williams, from Virginia Street and Other Poems

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Day Williams reads his poem, “Sestina: Blood Covenants”

Aurora Nevada Crucifixion

A sestina (Old Occitan: cledisat [klediˈzat]; also known as sestine, sextine, sextain) is a fixed verse form consisting of six stanzas of six lines each, normally followed by a three-line envoi. The words that end each line of the first stanza are used as line endings in each of the following stanzas, rotated in a set pattern.

The invention of the form is usually attributed to 12th-century troubadour Arnaut Daniel; after spreading to continental Europe, it first appeared in English in 1579, though sestinas were rarely written in Britain until the end of the 19th century. It remains a popular poetic form, and many continue to be written by contemporary poets.

~Wikipedia

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The Holy Ghost

Gives Christians verve,

While Christ gives love;

The Father, nerve.

~Day