1001 Quotations®: The Future by Day Williams

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33.
[Space travel] will come, but only when there is a high enough demand so that you can have a “public highway” system. To support today’s air traffic network, you’ve got to have a million passengers constantly on the move. The same will be true in space: It’s not really a technology problem, it’s more a sort of chicken-and-egg economic problem. I hope that it will grow, probably on the back of the military. The military has needs for all kinds of space launching and is prepared to pay for it. So with luck something like this space highway will develop. It doesn’t matter who pays for it initially. In the end it will belong to everybody.
~Freeman Dyson, Discover Magazine, June 2008

34.
All civilizations become either spacefaring or extinct.
~Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot
January 13
Scientists

35.
Science is the great antidote to the poison of enthusiasm and superstition.
~Adam Smith, The Wealth of Nations, 1776

36.
A world full of computers which you can’t understand, can’t fix and can’t use [because it is controlled by inaccessible proprietorial software] is a world controlled by machines.
~Eben Moglen, 2006

37.
The essence of science: ask an impertinent question, and you are on the way to a pertinent answer.
~Jacob Bronowski
January 14
Writers

38.
Time waits for no one.
~Wiz Dumb

39.
Every science begins as philosophy and ends as art.
~Will Durant, The Story of Philosophy, 1926
January 15
Futurists

40.
By the 2030s, the nonbiological portion of our intelligence will predominate.
~Ray Kurzweil

41.
I consider myself an inventor, entrepreneur, and author.
~Ray Kurzweil

42.
If you ask me what Futurism is, I cannot tell you; even the Futurists themselves seem a little doubtful; perhaps they are waiting for the future to find out.
~G.K. Chesterton in Alarms and Discursions
January 16
War and Peace

43.
The weapons were conceived and created by a small band of physicists and chemists; they remain a cataclysmic threat to the whole of human society and the natural environment.
~Barry Commoner

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1001 Quotations®: The Future by Day Williams

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January 8
Humor

22.
One problem with gazing too frequently into the past is that we may turn around to find the future has run out on us.
~Michael Cibenko

23.
A cynic is not merely one who reads bitter lessons from the past, he is one who is prematurely disappointed in the future.
~Sidney J. Harris

24.
Don’t panic!
~Arthur C. Clarke, when asked “If you could tell people one thing, just one thing, what would that be?” [from interview published in The Futurist, July-Aug 2008]
January 9
Physicists

25.
Even for the physicist the description in plain language will be a criterion of the degree of understanding that has been reached.
~Werner Karl Heisenberg. Werner Karl Heisenberg (1901 – 1976) was a German theoretical physicist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1932 “for the creation of quantum mechanics.”

26.
I never think of the future−it comes soon enough.
~Albert Einstein
January 10
Humor

27.
The very powerful and the very stupid have one thing in common. Instead of altering their views to fit the facts, they alter the facts to fit their views . . . which can be very uncomfortable if you happen to be one of the facts that needs altering.
~Doctor Who. Doctor Who is a British science fiction television program produced by the BBC. The program depicts the adventures of a Time Lord—a time travelling, humanoid alien known as the Doctor. He explores the universe in his “TARDIS,” a sentient, telepathic time-and-space-travel machine that flies through the time vortex. Its exterior appears as a blue British police box, a common sight in Britain in 1963, when the series first aired. Along with a succession of companions, the Doctor faces a variety of foes while working to save civilizations, help ordinary people, and right wrongs.

28.
The farther the experiment is from theory, the closer it is to the Nobel Prize.
~Frederic Joliot-Curie
January 11
Predictions

29.
This “telephone” has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication. The device is inherently of no value to us.
~Anonymous, 1876, Western Union internal memo

30.
We can surely never hope to see the craft of surgery made much more perfect than it is today. We are at the end of a chapter.
~George Berkeley. George Berkeley (1685 – 1753), also known as Bishop Berkeley (Bishop of Cloyne), was an Anglo-Irish philosopher whose primary achievement was the advancement of a theory he called “immaterialism” (later referred to as “subjective idealism” by others). This theory denies the existence of material substance and instead contends that familiar objects like tables and chairs are only ideas in the minds of perceivers, and as a result cannot exist without being perceived. Thus, as Berkeley famously put it, for physical objects “esse est percipi” (“to be is to be perceived”). Berkeley is also known for his critique of abstraction, an important premise in his argument for immaterialism

31.
The foolish idea of shooting at the moon is an example of the absurd length to which vicious specialization will carry scientists working in thought-tight compartments.
~A. W. Bickerton, 1926
January 12
Space Travel

32.
This is one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.
~Neil Armstrong

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1001 Quotations®: The Future by Day Williams

Robots and UFOs

 

8.

(1) A robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.

(2) A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the first law.

(3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

~Isaac Asimov, “The Three Laws of Robotics,” in I, Robot (1950), Frontispiece. Isaac Asimov (born Isaak Yudovich Ozimov; Russian: Исаак Юдович Озимов; 1920 – 1992) was an American author and professor of biochemistry at Boston University, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. Asimov was one of the most prolific writers of all time, having written or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards. His works have been published in nine out of ten major categories of the Dewey Decimal System.

 

9.

A number of years ago, when I was a freshly-appointed instructor, I met, for the first time, a certain eminent historian of science. At the time I could only regard him with tolerant condescension.

I was sorry of the man who, it seemed to me, was forced to hover about the edges of science. He was compelled to shiver endlessly in the outskirts, getting only feeble warmth from the distant sun of science- in-progress; while I, just beginning my research, was bathed in the heady liquid heat up at the very center of the glow.

In a lifetime of being wrong at many a point, I was never more wrong. It was I, not he, who was wandering in the periphery. It was he, not I, who lived in the blaze.

I had fallen victim to the fallacy of the “growing edge”; the belief that only the very frontier of scientific advance counted; that everything that had been left behind by that advance was faded and dead.

But is that true? Because a tree in spring buds and comes greenly into leaf, are those leaves therefore the tree? If the newborn twigs and their leaves were all that existed, they would form a vague halo of green suspended in mid-air, but surely that is not the tree. The leaves, by themselves, are no more than trivial fluttering decoration. It is the trunk and limbs that give the tree its grandeur and the leaves themselves their meaning.

There is not a discovery in science, however revolutionary, however sparkling with insight, that does not arise out of what went before. ‘If I have seen further than other men,’ said Isaac Newton, ‘it is because I have stood on the shoulders of giants.’

~Isaac Asimov, Adding A Dimension: Seventeen Essays on the History of Science (1964), Introduction.

 

10.

An atom-blaster is a good weapon, but it can point both ways.

~Isaac Asimov, The Foundation Trilogy (1951), Vol. 2, p. 207.

 

 

January 4

Change

 

11.

You could not step twice into the same river; for other waters are ever flowing on to you.

~Heraclitus, Fragment 41, quoted by Plato in Cratylus.

 

12.

Change is not made without inconvenience, even from worse to better.

~Richard Hooker, as quoted in the preface of Samuel Johnson’s Dictionary of the English Language (1755).

 

13.

There is a certain relief in change, even though it be from bad to worse! As I have often found in travelling in a stagecoach, that it is often a comfort to shift one’s position, and be bruised in a new place.

~Washington Irving, Tales of a Traveler (1824), Preface, p. 7.

 

 

January 5

Physicists

 

14.

Technology has advanced more in the last thirty years than in the previous two thousand. The exponential increase in advancement will only continue.

~Niels Bohr. Niels Henrik David Bohr (1885 – 1962) was a Danish physicist who made foundational contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922. He developed the model of the atom with the nucleus at the center and electrons in orbit around it, which he compared to the planets orbiting the sun. He worked on the idea in quantum mechanics that electrons move from one energy level to another in discrete steps, not continuously. Bohr mentored and collaborated with many of the top physicists of the century at his institute in Copenhagen. He was part of the British team of physicists working on the Manhattan Project. Bohr married Margrethe Nørlund in 1912, and one of their sons, Aage Bohr, was also a physicist and in 1975 also received the Nobel Prize.

 

15.

A physicist is just an atom’s way of looking at itself.

~Niels Bohr

 

16.

Every great and deep difficulty bears in itself its own solution. It forces us to change our thinking in order to find it.

~Niels Bohr

 

 

January 6

Humor

 

17.

Science in the modern world has many uses; its chief use, however, is to provide long words to cover the errors of the rich.

~G. K. Chesterton. Gilbert Keith Chesterton, KC*SG (1874 – 1936) was an English writer. He wrote on philosophy, ontology, poetry, plays, journalism, public lectures and debates, literary and art criticism, biography, Christian apologetics, and fiction, including fantasy and detective fiction. Chesterton is often referred to as the “prince of paradox.” Time magazine, in a review of a biography of Chesterton, observed of his writing style: “Whenever possible Chesterton made his points with popular sayings, proverbs, allegories—first carefully turning them inside out.”

 

18.

We have lost the art of living, and in the most important science of all, the science of daily life, the science of behavior, we are complete ignoramuses. We have psychology instead.

~D.H. Lawrence. David Herbert Lawrence (1885 – 1930) was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter who published as D. H. Lawrence. His collected works represent an extended reflection upon the dehumanizing effects of modernity and industrialization. In them, Lawrence confronts issues relating to emotional health and vitality, spontaneity, and instinct.

 

19.

Technological progress is like an axe in the hands of a pathological criminal.

~Albert Einstein. Albert Einstein (14 March 1879 – 18 April 1955) was a German-born theoretical physicist who developed the general theory of relativity, effecting a revolution in physics. For this achievement, Einstein is often regarded as the father of modern physics and the most influential physicist of the 20th century. While best known for his mass–energy equivalence formula E = mc2 (which has been dubbed “the world’s most famous equation”), he received the 1921 Nobel Prize in Physics “for his services to theoretical physics, and especially for his discovery of the law of the photoelectric effect.” The latter was pivotal in establishing quantum theory.

 

 

January 7

Songs and Poems

 

20.

God, if Thy will be so,

Enrich the time to come with smooth-faced peace,

With smiling plenty and fair prosperous days!

~William Shakespeare, Richard III (c. 1591), Act V, scene 5, line 32. William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptized) – 23 April 1616) was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world’s pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England’s national poet and the “Bard of Avon.” His extant works, including some collaborations, consist of about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, two epitaph  s on a man named John Combe, one epitaph on Elias James, and several other poems. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.

 

21.

How many ages hence

Shall this our lofty scene be acted over

In states unborn and accents yet unknown.

~William Shakespeare, Julius Cæsar (1599), Act III, scene 1, line 111.

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July 14
Writers

538.
One of the biggest roles of science fiction is to prepare people to accept the future without pain and to encourage a flexibility of the mind. Politicians should read science fiction, not westerns and detective stories.
~Arthur C. Clarke (1984), quoted in Jerome Agel (ed.), The Making of Kubrick’s 2001 (4th Ed. 1970), p. 300. In James E. Combs, Polpop: Politics and Popular Culture in America (1984), p. 147.

539.
I love that you get cold when it’s 71 degrees out. I love that it takes you an hour and a half to order a sandwich. I love that you get a little crinkle above your nose when you’re looking at me like I’m nuts. I love that after I spend the day with you, I can still smell your perfume on my clothes. And I love that you are the last person I want to talk to before I go to sleep at night. And it’s not because I’m lonely, and it’s not because it’s New Year’s Eve. I came here tonight because when you realize you want to spend the rest of your life with somebody, you want the rest of your life to start as soon as possible.
~Nora Ephron, When Harry Met Sally
July 15
Futurists

540.
Science, my lad, has been built upon many errors; but they are errors which it was good to fall into, for they led to the truth.
~Jules Verne (1828 – 1905), Journey to the Center of the Earth. Verne was a French writer best known as a pioneering author in science fiction.

541.
You may reasonably expect a man to walk a tightrope safely for ten minutes; it would be unreasonable to do so without accident for two hundred years.
~Bertrand Russell (1872—1970), British philosopher. On the subject of nuclear war.

542.
Hitherto man had to live with the idea of death as an individual; from now onward mankind will have to live with the idea of its death as a species.
~Arthur Koestler (1905−1983),
Hungarian-born British writer, referring to the development of the atomic bomb.
July 16
War and Peace

543.
In Catch-22, the figure of the black market and the ground of war merge into a monster presided over by the syndicate. When war and market merge, all money transactions begin to drip blood.
~Marshall McLuhan, Take Today : The Executive as Dropout (1972), p. 211.

544.
I know not with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones.
~Albert Einstein

545.
There’s one political party in this country, and that’s the corporate party.
~John Hall, physicist
July 17
Holy Bible

546.
Therefore the Lord himself will give you a sign: The virgin will be with child and will give birth to a son, and will call him Immanuel.
~Isaiah 7:14

547.
Immediately after the distress of those days the sun will be darkened, and the moon will not give its light; the stars will fall from the sky, and the heavenly bodies will be shaken. At that time the sign of the Son of Man will appear in the sky, and all the nations of the earth will mourn. They will see the Son of Man coming on the clouds of the sky, with power and great glory. And he will send his angels with a loud trumpet call, and they will gather his elect from the four winds, from one end of the heavens to the other.
~Matthew 24:29-31

548.
No one knows about that day or hour, not even the angels in heaven, nor the Son, but only the Father. As it was in the days of Noah, so it will be at the coming of the Son of Man.
~Matthew 24:36-37
July 18
Science Fiction Writers

549.
Science fiction is the most important literature in the history of the world, because it’s the history of ideas, the history of our civilization birthing itself. . . . Science fiction is central to everything we’ve ever done, and people who make fun of science fiction writers don’t know what they’re talking about.
~Ray Bradbury, Brown Daily Herald, March 24, 1995

550.
Go to the edge of the cliff and jump off. Build your wings on the way down.
~Ray Bradbury, Brown Daily Herald (24 March 1995)

551.
We were put here as witnesses to the miracle of life. We see the stars, and we want them. We are beholden to give back to the universe. . . . If we make landfall on another star system, we become immortal.
~Ray Bradbury, Speech to National School Board Association (1995)
July 19
Robots and UFOs

552.
The big thing that the robots bring to the table is that they allow us to gather information without danger to the lives of the rescuers.
~Mark Micire

553.
I am really excited! As the robots begin to take on their definite designs and we
start building, I think lots of people are getting really pumped.
~Kristina Haller

554.
The engineering design competition has grown tremendously in the last few years with the increased interest in robotics. The engineering aspect is a discipline that has reached down to the junior high level within the last few years. We’ve added a junior high level because the kids are sophisticated enough to build their own robots.
~Jaymie Pedigo

555.
I have the right to object. We are more than pill counters or robots. We have religious and professional beliefs.
~Cristina Gonzalez
July 20
Change

556.
Every process pushed far enough tends to reverse or flip suddenly. Chiasmus – the reversal to process caused by increasing its speed, scope or size.
~Marshall McLuhan, Take Today : The Executive as Dropout (1972), p. 6.

557.
Only puny secrets need protection. Big secrets are protected by public incredulity. You can actually dissipate a situation by giving it maximal coverage. As to alarming people, that’s done by rumors, not by coverage.
~Marshall McLuhan, Take Today : The Executive as Dropout (1972), p. 92.
July 21
Physicists

558.
Whoever is careless with the truth in small matters cannot be trusted with important matters.
~Albert Einstein

559.
I myself believe that there will one day be time travel because when we find that something isn’t forbidden by the over-arching laws of physics we usually eventually find a technological way of doing it.
~David Deutsch

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July 9
Physicists

524.
We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.
~Albert Einstein

525.
When the solution is simple, God is answering.
~Albert Einstein
July 10
Humor

526.
The future is here. It’s just not widely distributed yet.
~William Gibson

527.
Jadzia Dax: And as the 34th Rule of Acquisition states “Peace is good for business.”
Quark: That’s the 35th Rule.
Jadzia Dax: Oh, you’re right. What’s the 34th?
Quark: “War is good for business.” It’s easy to get them confused.
~From “Destiny,” Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993-1999), a science fiction television series based on Gene Roddenberry‘s Star Trek, it was created by Rick Berman and Michael Piller, and produced by Paramount Pictures.

528.
Benjamin Sisko: Brag all you want, but don’t get between me and the bloodwine!
Miles O’Brien: So, let me get this straight: all we have to do is get past an enemy fleet, avoid a tachyon detection grid, beam into the middle of Klingon headquarters and avoid the Brotherhood of the Sword long enough to set these things up and activate them in front of Gowron?
Worf: If we succeed, there will be many songs sung in our honor.
Miles O’Brien: Let’s hope we’re there to hear them.
~From “Apocalypse Rising,” Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993-1999), a science fiction television series based on Gene Roddenberry’s Star Trek, it was created by Rick Berman and Michael Piller, and produced by Paramount Pictures.

529.
[Worf’s young descendent is awestruck by him]
Young boy: Are you the son of Mogh?
Worf: Yes.
Young boy: Is it true you can kill someone just by looking at them?
Worf: Only when I am angry.
~From “Children of Time,” Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993-1999), a science fiction television series based on Gene Roddenberry’s Star Trek, it was created by Rick Berman and Michael Piller, and produced by Paramount Pictures.
July 11
Predictions

530.
(Speaking of late nineteenth-century self-regard within the British empire:)
Well, here we are on top of the world, and we have arrived at this peak to stay there forever. There is, of course, a thing called history, but history is something unpleasant that happens to other people. We are comfortably outside all of that I am sure.
~Arnold J. Toynbee

531.
That the automobile has practically reached the limit of its development is suggested by the fact that during the past year no improvements of a radical nature have been introduced.
~Anonymous, Scientific American, January 2, 1909
July 12
Space Travel

532.
When a place gets crowded enough to require ID’s, social collapse is not far away. It is time to go elsewhere. The best thing about space travel is that it made it possible to go elsewhere.
~Robert A. Heinlein

533.
I think that somebody with the resources and innovation and the idea is going to come out of nowhere and come up with a successful space travel program.
~Kevin J. Anderson

534.
The president felt that it was important to send an ordinary citizen to experience the excitement of space travel as a representative for all Americans.
~Christa McAuliffe

535.
I think space will be conquered through the mind rather than the clumsy medium of space travel.
~Patrick Troughton
July 13
Scientists

536.
Science is built up of facts, as a house is built of stones; but an accumulation of facts is no more a science than a heap of stones is a house.
~Henri Poincaré, Science and Hypothesis, 1905

537.
Scientists should always state the opinions upon which their facts are based.
~Anonymous

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July 3
Robots and UFOs

508.
Physical jobs will be done by robots and mental jobs will be done by smart computers.
~Brian Pearson

509.
Most kids should be familiar with building blocks, and this incorporates robots into the familiar. You get to play with building blocks with a robotic arm that you can control from a distance.
~Jennifer Farrington

510.
There are people working on things like a pill that can be swallowed to take pictures, but that’s passive technology. These robots can actually go in and do something.
~Dmitry Oleynikov

511.
Unlike (the NASA) robots, Beagle 2 won’t be going sightseeing. It is intent on discovering where there is or was life on Mars. It is happy to trade measurements for mobility.
~Colin Pillinger
July 4
Change

512.
When the rate of change increases to the point that real time required to assimilate change exceeds the time in with change must be manifest, the enterprise is going to find itself in deep yohurt.
~John Zachman (1994); reported in: Ronald G. Ross, Principles of the Business Rule Approach (2003), p. 35.

513.
Change is not merely necessary to life — it is life.
~Alvin Toffler, Future Shock‎ (1970), p. 304.
July 5
Physicists

514.
There must be no barriers for freedom of inquiry. There is no place for dogma in science. The scientist is free, and must be free to ask any question, to doubt any assertion, to seek for any evidence, to correct any errors.
~J. Robert Oppenheimer

515.
[I]t is probable that the scheme of physics will be enlarged so as to embrace the behavior of living organisms under the influence of life and mind. Biology and psychology are not alien sciences; their operations are not solely mechanical, nor can they be formulated by physics as it is today; but they belong to a physical universe, and their mode of action ought to be capable of being formulated in terms of an enlarged physics in the future, in which the ether will take a predominant place. On the other hand it may be thought that those entities cannot be brought to book so easily, and that they will always elude our ken. If so, there will be a dualism in the universe, which posterity will find staggering, but that will not alter the facts.
~Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge, in Past Years: an Autobiography (1932), 350. Quoted in book review, Waldehar Kaempfert, “Sir Oliver Lodge Stands by the Old Physics,” New York Times (21 February 1932), BR5.
July 6
Humor

516.
It was all very well for an Englishman like Mr. Fogg to make the tour of the world with a carpet-bag; a lady could not be expected to travel comfortably under such conditions.
~Jules Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days (1873)

517.
Phileas Fogg had won his wager, and had made his journey around the world in eighty days. To do this he had employed every means of conveyance — steamers, railways, carriages, yachts, trading-vessels, sledges, elephants. The eccentric gentleman had throughout displayed all his marvelous qualities of coolness and exactitude. But what then? What had he really gained by all this trouble? What had he brought back from this long and weary journey?
Nothing, say you? Perhaps so; nothing but a charming woman, who, strange as it may appear, made him the happiest of men!
Truly, would you not for less than that make the tour around the world?
~Jules Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days (1873)

518.
It is sometimes an appropriate response to reality to go insane.
~Philip K. Dick, VALIS (1981)
July 7
Songs and Poems

519.
Exact science and its practical movements are no checks on the greatest poet, but always his encouragement and support . . . The sailor and traveler, the anatomist, chemist, astronomer, geologist, phrenologist, spiritualist, mathematician, historian and lexicographer are not poets, but they are the lawgivers of poets and their construction underlies the structure of every perfect poem.
~Walt Whitman, in Walt Whitman and William Michael Rossetti (ed.), “Preface to the First Edition of Leaves of Grass,” Poems By Walt Whitman (1868), 46.

520.
I like the scientific spirit—the holding off, the being sure but not too sure, the willingness to surrender ideas when the evidence is against them: this is ultimately fine—it always keeps the way beyond open.
~Walt Whitman, in Horace Traubel, With Walt Whitman in Camden (1906), Vol. 1, 101.
July 8
Humor

521.
James T. Kirk: How much refit time before we can take her out again?
Montgomery Scott: Eight weeks, Sir, [Kirk opens his mouth] but ye don’t have eight weeks, so I’ll do it for ye in two.
James T. Kirk: Mr. Scott, have you always multiplied your repair estimates by a factor of four?
Montgomery Scott: Certainly, Sir. How else can I keep my reputation as a miracle worker?
James T. Kirk: [over the intercom] Your reputation is secure, Scotty.
~Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (Paramount Pictures, 1984), the third feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. It is a direct sequel to Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, and has a similar feel, although often with a lighter, more humorous touch. Directed by Leonard Nimoy. Written by Harve Bennett.

522.
[The Klingons have boarded the Enterprise]
Torg: My lord, the ship appears to be deserted.
Kruge: How can that be? They’re hiding!
Torg: Yes, sir. But the bridge is run by computer. It is the only thing speaking.
[Torg’s last words]
Kruge: Speaking? Let me hear.
Computer: 9 . . . 8 . . . 7 . . . 6 . . . 5 . . .
Kruge: [shouts] Get out! Get out of there! Get out!
Computer: 2 . . . 1 . . .
[The Enterprise bridge explodes]
~Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (Paramount Pictures, 1984).

523.
James T. Kirk: “All I ask is a tall ship and a star to steer her by.”
Leonard McCoy: Melville.
Spock: John Masefield.
Leonard McCoy: Are you sure about that?
Spock: I am well-versed in the classics, Doctor.
Leonard McCoy: Then how come you don’t know Row, Row, Row Your Boat?
[Spock raises both eyebrows]
~Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (Paramount Pictures, 1989), the fifth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. The titular “Final Frontier” refers to transcending the boundaries of our universe, and into the realm of God, truly where no man has gone before. Directed by William Shatner. Written by William Shatner, Harve Bennett, and David Loughery.

 

1001 Quotations®: The Future by Day Williams

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June 29
Leaders

494.
[Recalling Professor Ira Remsen’s remarks (1895) to a group of his graduate students about to go out with their degrees into the world beyond the university:]
He talked to us for an hour on what was ahead of us; cautioned us against giving up the desire to push ahead by continued study and work. He warned us against allowing our present accomplishments to be the high spot in our lives. He urged us not to wait for a brilliant idea before beginning independent research, and emphasized the fact the Lavoisier’s first contribution to chemistry was the analysis of a sample of gypsum. He told us that the fields in which the great masters had worked were still fruitful; the ground had only been scratched and the gleaner could be sure of ample reward.
~James F. Norris, quoted in Frederick Hutton Getman, The Life of Ira Remsen (1980), p. 73.

495.
Only those who dare to fail greatly can ever achieve greatly.
~Robert F. Kennedy

496.
It looks like the future’s really bright.
~Michael P. Anderson, astronaut

497.
Not to destroy but to construct,
I hold the unconquerable belief
that science and peace will triumph over ignorance and war
that nations will come together
not to destroy but to construct
and that the future belongs to those
who accomplish most for humanity.
[His 1956 Christmas card.]
~Adlai E. Stevenson in Respectfully Quoted: A Dictionary of Quotations (1980), pp. 366-367. The card used a variant of Louis Pasteur’s earlier remark in 1892
June 30
Writers

498.
What is possible can never be demonstrated to be false; and ‘tis possible the course of nature may change, since we can conceive such a change. Nay, I will go farther, and assert, that he could not so much as prove by any probable arguments, that the future must be conformable to the past. All probable arguments are built on the supposition, that there is this conformity betwixt the future and the past, and therefore can never prove it. This conformity is a matter of fact, and if it must be proved, will admit of no proof but from experience. But our experience in the past can be a proof of nothing for the future, but upon a supposition, that there is a resemblance betwixt them. This therefore is a point, which can admit of no proof at all, and which we take for granted without any proof.
~David Hume, An Abstract of A Treatise on Human Nature (1740), ed. John Maynard Keynes and Piero Sraffa (1938), p. 15.

499.
When a scientist is ahead of his times, it is often through misunderstanding of current, rather than intuition of future truth. In science there is never any error so gross that it won’t one day, from some perspective, appear prophetic.
~Jean Rostand, Pensées d’un Biologiste (1939). Translated in The Substance of Man (1962), Chapter 7.

500.
A man who can dominate a London dinner table can dominate the world. The future belongs to the dandy. It is the exquisites who are going to rule.
~Oscar Wilde (1854−1900), Anglo-Irish playwright, author. Lord Illingworth, in A Woman of No Importance, Act 3.)
July 1
Holy Bible

501.
“The days are coming,” declares the LORD, “when I will raise up to David a righteous Branch, a King who will reign wisely and do what is just and right in the land.
~Jeremiah 23:5

502.
Comfort, comfort my people, says your God. Speak tenderly to Jerusalem, and proclaim to her that her hard service has been completed, that her sin has been paid for, that she has received from the LORD‘s hand double for all her sins. A voice of one calling: “In the desert prepare the way for the LORD; make straight in the wilderness a highway for our God. Every valley shall be raised up, every mountain and hill made low; the rough ground shall become level, the rugged places a plain. And the glory of the LORD will be revealed, and all mankind together will see it. For the mouth of the LORD has spoken.” . . . say to the towns of Judah, “Here is your God!”
~Isaiah 40:1-5, 9

503.
[S]ay to those with fearful hearts, “Be strong, do not fear; your God will come, he will come with vengeance; with divine retribution he will come to save you.” Then will the eyes of the blind be opened and the ears of the deaf unstopped. Then will the lame leap like a deer, and the mute tongue shout for joy. Water will gush forth in the wilderness and streams in the desert.
~Isaiah 35:4-6

504.
The LORD your God will raise up for you a prophet like me from
among your own brothers. You must listen to him. For this is what you asked of the
LORD your God at Horeb on the day of the assembly when you said, “Let
us not hear the voice of the LORD our God nor see this great fire anymore, or we will
die.”
The LORD said to me: “What they say is good.
I will raise up for them a prophet like you from among their brothers; I will put my words in his mouth, and he will tell them everything I command him.
~Deuteronomy 18:15-18
July 2
Science Fiction Writers

505.
Hasn’t all this taught you anything?” Annette asked Gabriel Baines as they waited for the simulacrum’s return and report.
“Like what?”
“That there is no perfect defense. There is no protection. Being alive means being exposed; it’s the nature of life to be hazardous—it’s the stuff of living.”
~Philip K. Dick, Clans of the Alphane Moon, Chapter 13 (p. 226) (1964)

506.
Once they notice you, Jason realized, they never completely close the file. You can never get back your anonymity. It is vital not to be noticed in the first place.
~Philip K. Dick, Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said, Chapter 6 (p. 75) (1974)

507.
“But what are you supposed to do in a society that’s corrupt? Are you supposed to obey corrupt laws? Is it a crime to break a law that’s a rotten law, or an oath that’s rotten?
“It’s a crime,” Cartwright admitted slowly. “But it may be the right thing to do.”
“In a society of criminals,” Shaeffer offered, “the innocent man goes to jail.”
“Who decides when the society is made up of criminals? Benteley demanded. “How do you know when your society has gone wrong? How do you know when it’s right to stop obeying the laws?”
“You just know,” Rita O’Neill said fiercely.
~Philip K. Dick, Solar Lottery, Chapter 14 (pp. 156-157) (1955)

 

 

1001 Quotations®: The Future by Day Williams

May 3
Robots and UFOs

340.
Jeremy Clarkson: Man may have tempered the specter of nuclear evil but, tonight, I have the unenviable task of reporting that warfare has been taken out of man’s hands. We’re now at the mercy of machines and a battle − the likes of which we have never seen before – is about to begin. Outside the studio, women have lashed themselves to the railings. Britain is about to witness the birth of Robot Wars. Which is all about robots . . . fighting.
~The first introduction to Robot Wars, Series One, Episode One. Robot Wars was a British game show modeled on a US-based competition of the same name. It was broadcast on BBC Two from 1998 until 2003, with its final series broadcast on Five in 2003 and 2004. Additional series were filmed for specific sectors of the global market, including two series of Robot Wars Extreme Warriors with U.S. competitors for the TNN network (hosted by Mick Foley and Rebecca Grant), and two of Dutch Robot Wars for distribution in the Netherlands. The fourth series of the UK Robot Wars was brought to the United States on TNN as Robot Wars: Grand Champions in 2002, and hosted by Joanie Laurer. In 2003, the roboteers themselves formed The Fighting Robot Association and with their associated event organizers, carry on participating in competitions for new audiences.

341.
Brad: (about Jenny) Come on Doc, I’m sure no one will notice her.
Dr. Wakeman: (skeptical) A six and a half foot mechanical girl, and no one will notice?
~My Life as a Teenage Robot, an animated TV show on Nickelodeon about the misadventures of a robot with the mind of a teenager. From “Raggedy Android / Class Action.”

342.
Alien Karl: (as he and his wife walk back to their UFO) Yeah, well personally, I can’t wait to get off this hick planet. Bunch of rip-off artists, these earthlings. Five bucks for a cup of coffee. No extraterrestrial discount at the hotel. And I know that bellboy stole my tricorder.
~My Life as a Teenage Robot, “Ear No Evil /
Unlicensed Flying Object“
May 4
Change

343.
Hereditary
Rather than purchased; what he cannot change,
Than what he chooses.
~William Shakespeare, Antony and Cleopatra (1600s), Act I, scene 4, line 14.

344.
This world is not for aye, nor ‘tis not strange
That even our loves should with our fortunes change. –
~William Shakespeare, Hamlet (1600−02), Act III, scene 2, line 210.

345.
That we would do,
We should do when we would; for this “would” changes
And hath abatements and delays as many
As there are tongues, are hands, are accidents;
And then this “should” is like a spendthrift sigh,
That hurts by easing.
~William Shakespeare, Hamlet (1600−1602), Act IV, scene 7, line 119.
May 5
Physicists

346.
Shall I refuse my dinner because I do not fully understand the process of digestion?
~Oliver Heaviside, English physicist

347.
Physics isn’t a religion. If it were, we’d have a much easier time raising money.
~Leon Lederman

348.
All science is either physics or stamp collecting.
~Ernest Rutherford
May 6
Humor

349.
The great tragedy of Science: the slaying of a beautiful hypothesis by an ugly fact.
~Thomas H. Huxley/ Thomas Henry Huxley PC FRS (1825 – 1895) was an English biologist (anatomist), known as “Darwin’s Bulldog” for his advocacy of Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution.

350.
I didn’t think; I experimented.
~Anthony Burgess. John Anthony Burgess Wilson, FRSL (1917 – 1993) – who published under the pen name Anthony Burgess – was an English writer. From relatively modest beginnings in a Manchester Catholic family in the North of England, he eventually became one of the best known English literary figures of the latter half of the twentieth century. Although Burgess was predominantly a comic writer, the dystopian satire A Clockwork Orange remains his best known novel. In 1971 it was adapted into a highly controversial film by Stanley Kubrick, which Burgess said was chiefly responsible for the popularity of the book.

351.
Physics is geometric proof on steroids.
~S.A. Sachs
May 7
Songs and Poems

352.
The taste for pleasure attaches us to the present. The concern with our salvation leaves us hanging on the future.
~Charles Baudelaire (1821−1867), French poet and critic. My Heart Laid Bare, XXXIX (1887).) Baudelaire produced notable work as an essayist, art critic, and pioneering translator of Edgar Allan Poe. His most famous work, Les Fleurs du Mal (The Flowers of Evil), expresses the changing nature of beauty in modern, industrializing Paris during the 19th century. Baudelaire’s highly original style of prose-poetry influenced a whole generation of poets, including Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud and Stéphane Mallarmé, among many others. He is credited with coining the term “modernity” (modernité) to designate the fleeting, ephemeral experience of life in an urban metropolis, and the responsibility art has to capture that experience

353.
The best simpleminded test of expertise in a particular area is an ability to win money in a series of bets on future occurrences in that area.
~Graham Allison

354.
The foolish and the dead alone never change their opinions.
~James Russel Lowell
May 8
Humor

355.
Whoever undertakes to set himself up as a judge in the field of Truth and Knowledge is shipwrecked by the laughter of the gods.
~Albert Einstein

356.
Some things need to be believed to be seen.
~Guy Kawasaki

357.
Science is a wonderful thing if one does not have to earn one’s living at it.
~Albert Einstein
May 9
Physicists

358.
If you are different, you had better hide it, and pretend to be solemn and wooden-headed. Until you make your fortune. For most wooden-headed people worship money; and, really, I do not see what else they can do.
~Oliver Heaviside (1850 – 1925)
was a self-taught English electrical engineer, mathematician, and physicist who adapted
complex numbers to the study of electrical circuits, invented mathematical techniques to
the solution of differential equations (later found to be equivalent to Laplace transforms),
reformulated Maxwell’s field equations in terms of electric and magnetic forces and
energy flux, and independently co-formulated vector analysis.

359.
Electric and magnetic forces. May they live for ever, and never be forgot, if only to remind us that the science of electromagnetics, in spite of the abstract nature of its theory, involving quantities whose nature is entirely unknown at the present, is really and truly founded on the observations of real Newtonian forces, electric and magnetic respectively.
~Oliver Heaviside, Electromagnetic Theory (1912), Volume III; p. 1; “The Electrician” Pub. Co., London.

future 2mb

Feb. 3: Benjamin Franklin

February 3

Benjamin Franklin

 

92.

Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain, and most fools do.

~Benjamin Franklin

 

93.

Great estates may venture more,

But little boats should keep near shore.

~Benjamin Franklin

 

94.

Have you somewhat to do tomorrow, do it today.

~Benjamin Franklin

Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C.

1001 Quotations®: The Future by Day Williams

July 2
Science Fiction Writers

505.
Hasn’t all this taught you anything?” Annette asked Gabriel Baines as they waited for the simulacrum’s return and report.
“Like what?”
“That there is no perfect defense. There is no protection. Being alive means being exposed; it’s the nature of life to be hazardous—it’s the stuff of living.”
~Philip K. Dick, Clans of the Alphane Moon, Chapter 13 (p. 226) (1964)

506.
Once they notice you, Jason realized, they never completely close the file. You can never get back your anonymity. It is vital not to be noticed in the first place.
~Philip K. Dick, Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said, Chapter 6 (p. 75) (1974)

507.
“But what are you supposed to do in a society that’s corrupt? Are you supposed to obey corrupt laws? Is it a crime to break a law that’s a rotten law, or an oath that’s rotten?
“It’s a crime,” Cartwright admitted slowly. “But it may be the right thing to do.”
“In a society of criminals,” Shaeffer offered, “the innocent man goes to jail.”
“Who decides when the society is made up of criminals? Benteley demanded. “How do you know when your society has gone wrong? How do you know when it’s right to stop obeying the laws?”
“You just know,” Rita O’Neill said fiercely.
~Philip K. Dick, Solar Lottery, Chapter 14 (pp. 156-157) (1955)
July 3
Robots and UFOs

508.
Physical jobs will be done by robots and mental jobs will be done by smart computers.
~Brian Pearson

509.
Most kids should be familiar with building blocks, and this incorporates robots into the familiar. You get to play with building blocks with a robotic arm that you can control from a distance.
~Jennifer Farrington

510.
There are people working on things like a pill that can be swallowed to take pictures, but that’s passive technology. These robots can actually go in and do something.
~Dmitry Oleynikov

511.
Unlike (the NASA) robots, Beagle 2 won’t be going sightseeing. It is intent on discovering where there is or was life on Mars. It is happy to trade measurements for mobility.
~Colin Pillinger
July 4
Change

512.
When the rate of change increases to the point that real time required to assimilate change exceeds the time in with change must be manifest, the enterprise is going to find itself in deep yohurt.
~John Zachman (1994); reported in: Ronald G. Ross, Principles of the Business Rule Approach (2003), p. 35.

513.
Change is not merely necessary to life — it is life.
~Alvin Toffler, Future Shock‎ (1970), p. 304.
July 5
Physicists

514.
There must be no barriers for freedom of inquiry. There is no place for dogma in science. The scientist is free, and must be free to ask any question, to doubt any assertion, to seek for any evidence, to correct any errors.
~J. Robert Oppenheimer

515.
[I]t is probable that the scheme of physics will be enlarged so as to embrace the behavior of living organisms under the influence of life and mind. Biology and psychology are not alien sciences; their operations are not solely mechanical, nor can they be formulated by physics as it is today; but they belong to a physical universe, and their mode of action ought to be capable of being formulated in terms of an enlarged physics in the future, in which the ether will take a predominant place. On the other hand it may be thought that those entities cannot be brought to book so easily, and that they will always elude our ken. If so, there will be a dualism in the universe, which posterity will find staggering, but that will not alter the facts.
~Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge, in Past Years: an Autobiography (1932), 350. Quoted in book review, Waldehar Kaempfert, “Sir Oliver Lodge Stands by the Old Physics,” New York Times (21 February 1932), BR5.
July 6
Humor

516.
It was all very well for an Englishman like Mr. Fogg to make the tour of the world with a carpet-bag; a lady could not be expected to travel comfortably under such conditions.
~Jules Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days (1873)

517.
Phileas Fogg had won his wager, and had made his journey around the world in eighty days. To do this he had employed every means of conveyance — steamers, railways, carriages, yachts, trading-vessels, sledges, elephants. The eccentric gentleman had throughout displayed all his marvelous qualities of coolness and exactitude. But what then? What had he really gained by all this trouble? What had he brought back from this long and weary journey?
Nothing, say you? Perhaps so; nothing but a charming woman, who, strange as it may appear, made him the happiest of men!
Truly, would you not for less than that make the tour around the world?
~Jules Verne, Around the World in Eighty Days (1873)

518.
It is sometimes an appropriate response to reality to go insane.
~Philip K. Dick, VALIS (1981)future 2mb