Nevada Senator Harry Reid Refuses to Do His Job and Pass and Budget Bill

Democrats punt on Senate budget bill for third year
Committee chairman to revisit Bowles-Simpson plan of 2010

By Stephen Dinan-The Washington Times Tuesday, April 17, 2012

 

In a stunning backtrack that virtually guarantees Congress for the third year will be unable to produce a budget, Senate Democrats’ top budget writer Tuesday canceled this week’s expected votes on a 2013 fiscal blueprint.

Instead, Budget Committee Chairman Kent Conrad, North Dakota Democrat, said he will use the next few months to try to breathe life into the shelved 2-year-old Bowles-Simpson deficit commission proposal.

Mr. Conrad said he wasn’t going to be able to reach a bipartisan agreement on a budget plan and he decided instead to try to kick-start a longer-term debate.

“This is the wrong time to vote in the committee. This is the wrong time to vote on the floor,” Mr. Conrad told reporters as he announced his strategy. “We do need to try to maximize the chance as we get closer to all the tax cuts expiring and the sequester being imposed that we’re ready to act.”

He said he will still convene the Budget Committee this week and introduce his plan, but won’t hold any votes or debate any amendments.

His move stunned Senate Republicans, who had been preparing amendments for Wednesday and Thursday.

“It’s hard to negotiate with somebody who won’t tell you where they are,” said Sen. Jeff Sessions, the ranking Republican on the Budget Committee, who said Mr. Conrad was breaking a promise he made to debate and vote on a budget.

Hanging over the discussion is Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, Nevada Democrat, who had steadfastly said he would not bring a budget to the floor this year — and who, Republicans said, pressured Mr. Conrad into complying.

On Tuesday, Mr. Reid declined to answer specific questions about his strategy but told reporters he had “nothing but confidence for Kent Conrad.”

 

Read more: Democrats punt on Senate budget bill for third year – Washington Times

The Mystery of Barack Obama (Barry Soetoro) Continues


But while Obama tries to divert attention to Romney’s great wealth, the mystery of Barack Obama continues. Obama needs to be “open and transparent,” as he promised to be 4 years ago. The non-Fox media needs to wake up, get off their hind ends, and do a job of investigative reporting.

The Mystery Of Barack Obama Continues

By Steve Baldwin for the Western Center for Journalism

obama 1 dreams of my father The Mystery of Barack Obama ContinuesMost Americans don’t realize we have elected a president whom we know very little about.


Researchers have discovered that Obama’s autobiographical books are little more than PR stunts, as they have little to do with the actual events of his life. The fact is we know less about President Obama than perhaps any other president in American history and much of this is due to actual efforts to hide his record. This should concern all Americans.

A nation-wide network of researchers has sprung up to attempt to fill in the blanks, but at every opportunity Obama’s high-priced lawyers have built walls around various records or simply made them disappear. It is estimated that Obama’s legal team has now spent well over $1.4 million dollars blocking access to documents every American should have access to. The question is why would he spend so much money to do this?

The president who campaigned for a more “open government” and “full disclosure” will not unseal his medical records, his school records, his birth records or his passport records. He will not release his Harvard records, his Columbia College records, or his Occidental College records—he will not even release his Columbia College thesis. All his legislative records from the Illinois State Senate are missing and he claims his scheduling records during those State Senate years are lost as well. In addition, no one can find his school records for the elite K-12 college prep school, Punahou School, he attended in Hawaii.

What is he hiding? Well, for starters, some of these records will shed light on his citizenship and birth.

For example, Obama’s application to Punahou School – now mysteriously missing – would likely contain a birth certificate. And, obama 2 scott and barry 3rd grade 1969 punahou school in hawaii The Mystery of Barack Obama Continuesaccording to attorney Gary Kreep, “his Occidental College records are important as they may show he attended there as a foreign exchange student.” Indeed, Obama used his Indonesian name “Barry Soetoro” while attending Occidental. Kreep has filed lawsuits challenging Obama’s eligibility to be president and as part of his lawsuit he requested Obama’s records from Occidental. However, Obama’s lawyers quickly moved to stop Occidental from honoring this request.

Furthermore, now that at least three document authentication experts have declared the scanned “Certificate of Live Birth” Obama’s campaign team gave to a pro-Obama website to be an obvious phony; we know that he is hiding something here as well.

Over 49 separate law suits have been filed on the eligibility/birth certificate issue alone, with several of the suits making it all the way the United States Supreme Court, only to be denied a full hearing.

obama 3 saudi prince al walid bin talah The Mystery of Barack Obama Continues

Pictured: Saudi Prince Al-Walid bin Talah

What’s more, there are questions about how he paid for his Harvard Law School education since, despite a claim by Michele Obama, no one has produced any evidence that he received student loans. The Obamas will not release any student loan details despite repeated requests from the Chicago Tribune. However, it appears that his Harvard education may have been paid for by a foreign source. Khalid Al-Mansour, an advisor to Saudi prince Al-Walid bin Talah, told Manhattan Borough president, Percy Sutton, that he was raising money for Obama’s Harvard tuition. Incidentally, Prince Tala is the largest donor to CAIR, a Muslim group declared by the U.S. Government in 2007 as an unindicted co-conspirator in a terrorist financing trial. At least three of CAIR’s leaders have been indicted for terrorist activities. Al-Mansour’s admission opens up speculation as to whether Muslim interests have assisted Obama’s career in the hope he would eventually be in a position someday to promote their interests.

More recently, it was discovered that Obama’s Selective Service card may have been doctored. Federal law requires all American males to register for the Selective Service (the draft) in case a major war broke out. Blogger Debbie Schlussel has discovered solid evidence that Obama’s Selective Service registration form was submitted not when he was younger as required, but rather in 2008 and then altered to look older. Indeed, the forgers forgot to alter the “Document Location Number” which shows that it is clearly a 2008 form. This is fraud and it’s a felony and Schlussel’s allegations are backed up by Stephen Coffman, a former high-ranking Federal agent. Moreover, the document shows a September 4th, 1980 date and the location of the transaction as Hawaii, but at that time Obama was thousands of miles away attending Occidental College in Los Angeles.

The real reason why Obama probably did not submit this form as a teenager is that he assumed his Kenyan or Indonesian citizenship exempted him from this requirement. But clearly, as he grew older and entered politics, he saw that any documents revealing a foreign birth – Selective Service registration, birth certificate, school applications, etc – would be problematic if he ran for the presidency. Thus, it is not a coincidence that every document which contains information about his birth or citizenship is either missing, sealed, or has been altered.

Indeed, everywhere one looks into Obama’s background, we find sealed records, scrubbed websites, altered documents, deception and unanswered questions. Can anyone imagine for a second if John McCain or George Bush had blocked access to his school, medical, and birth records? It would have been headlines in their case,  but as with everything else concerning Obama, the media has given him a pass on this.

Of all these marvels, the latest mystery and probably most perplexing is that of Obama’s social security number. It appears that Obama has multiple identities in term of possessing numerous social security numbers. Orly Taitz, an attorney who has filed numerous suits against Obama regarding his eligibility to serve as president, appears to have been the first to discover this. In her suit, representing a number of military officers who are refusing to serve under an ineligible commander in chief, she hired private investigator Neil Sankey to conduct research on Obama’s prior addresses and Social Society numbers. Using Intelius, Lexis Nexis, Choice Point and other public records, Sankey found around 25 Social Security numbers connected with Obama’s name.

However, it may not be as many as 25, since Sankey also searched using closely related names such as: “Barak Obama,” “Batock Obama,” “Barok Obama,” and “Barrack Obama.” There may very well be some Kenyans living in America with the same last name and a similar first name. In any case, I will exclude these records for the purpose of this research and focus only on names spelled exactly like his name. Moreover, we can verify many of the Social Security numbers as valid since they’re connected to addresses at which we know Obama resided. Needless to say, there are also a slew of address and social security numbers connected to addresses in states that Obama has no known connection to.

In Obama’s home state, Illinois, Sankey tracked down 16 different addresses for a Barack Obama or a Barack H. Obama, of which all are addresses he was known to have lived at. Two Social Security numbers appear for these addresses, one beginning with 042 and one starting 364.

In California, where Obama attended Occidental College, there are six addresses listed for him, all within easy driving distance of the college. However, there are three Social Security numbers connected to these addresses, 537 and two others, each beginning with 999.

There are no addresses listed in New York where he attended Columbia University, but there is one listed for him in nearby Jackson, NJ, with a Social Security number beginning with 485.

obama 4 713 hart senate office building The Mystery of Barack Obama Continues

713 Hart Senate Office Building

In Massachusetts – where Obama attended Harvard Law School – we find three addresses, all using the 042 Social Security number. After Obama was elected to the United States Senate in 2005, he moved into an apartment at 300 Massachusetts Ave NW; the Social Security number attached to that address is the 042 one. Yet, three years later, Obama used a different Social Security number for an address listed as: 713 Hart Senate Office Building. This was the address of his United States Senate office. This Social Security number began with 282 and was verified by the government in 2008.

This mystery grows even stranger as other addresses and Social Security numbers for Barack Obama appear in a dozen other states not known to be connected to him. Again, I am excluding those records names not spelled exactly like his name.

  • Tennessee, one address with a Social Security number beginning with 427
  • Colorado, one address, with a Social Security number beginning with 456.
  • Utah, two addresses, with two Social Security numbers beginning with 901 and 799.
  • Missouri has one address and one Social Security number beginning with 999.
  • Florida has two addresses listed for his him, three if you count one listed as “Barry Obama.” One is connected to a Social Security number beginning with 762.
  • In Georgia there are three addresses listed for him, all with different Social Security numbers: 579, 420, and 423.
  • In Texas there are four different addresses listed for him, one is connected to Social Security number 675.
  • There are two addresses listed for Barack Obama in Oregon and one address listed for him in  the states of Wisconsin, Michigan, South Carolina, and Pennsylvania.

All told, there are 49 addresses and 16 different Social Security numbers listed for a person whose name is spelled “Barack Obama.” In some cases, the middle initial “H” is listed. If you were to expand the search to include closely related names such as: “Barac,” “Barak,” and “Barrack” Obama, you would find more than a dozen additional addresses and Social Security numbers.

Finally, the one Social Security number Obama most frequently used, the one beginning with 042, is a number issued in Connecticut sometime during 1976-1977, yet there is no record of Obama ever living or working in Connecticut. Indeed, during this time period Obama would have been 15-16 years old and living in Hawaii at the time.

obama 5 ann stanley and madelyn dunham The Mystery of Barack Obama Continues

Ann, Stanley and Madelyn Dunham

Nevertheless, all this mystery surrounding Obama appears to be a generational thing. Researchers have discovered nearly a dozen aliases, at least two different Social Security numbers, and upwards of over 99 separate addresses for Ann Dunham, his mother. We do know she worked for the ultra liberal Ford Foundation but we also know she may have earned some income from pornographic poses, as evidenced by photos recently discovered by some researchers—how embarrassing. The only thing researchers are able to find out about Obama’s mother is the fact she made porn. I’m sure that’s a first for presidential mothers.

But we also know that Obama’s mother and grandparents associated with Communist Party leaders such as Frank Marshall Davis, a man who, according to Obama’s book, Dreams from my Father, was his main mentor during much of his Hawaiian boyhood (although Obama tried to disguise his identity in his book). During the Cold War, Davis was named by congressional investigators as a key member of a secretive pro-Soviet networked that existed in Hawaii at that time.

obama 6 communist party leader frank marshall davis The Mystery of Barack Obama Continues

Communist Party leader, Frank Marshall Davis

The lack of documents regarding Obama also extends to his mother and to his grandparents. Indeed, researchers have been unable to find marriage licenses for his mother’s two marriages, assuming she was ever legally married. Ditto goes for the marriage license for Ann’s parents. They cannot find birth certificates for her, her parents, or for even for her grandparents. Even more so, despite Obama’s boast of his grandfather’s military service, there’s no record of that either. For reasons no one knows, much of Obama’s life, his mother’s life and his grandparent’s life has been erased from the records as if they never existed.

But why would someone obtain so many Social Security numbers? According to investigators, those who create additional Social Society numbers are typically engaged in criminal activities such as Social Security fraud, tax fraud, real estate fraud, campaign

obama 7 barrack obama and his granmother madeline dunham The Mystery of Barack Obama Continues

Barrack Obama and his Grandmother, Madelyn Dunham.

“Madeline Dunham was a volunteer at the Oahu Circuit Court probate department and had access to the Social Security numbers of deceased people.

contributions fraud, voter fraud and so on. While the private investigator who compiled this list says multiple social security numbers does not automatically prove there’s criminal activity involved, he states that “having said that, I have personally experienced many, many cases where such information has led to subsequent exposure of fraud, deception, money laundering and other crimes.“What is interesting to note is that Obama’s grandmother, Madelyn Dunham, was a volunteer at the Oahu Circuit Court probate department and had access to the Social Security numbers of deceased people.

It is clear that more research needs to be done on this issue. The Western Center for Journalism

( http://www.westernjournalism.com) is inviting readers to join the search for the truth. If you have any information about any of the addresses listed, they would love to hear from you. To find a complete list of all the addresses and Social Security numbers listed in the public record for Obama and family, please go to the Western Center for Journalism.

Qualities of an Investigative Reporter

Let’s raise up investigative reporters with passion and courage who will investigate Barack Obama’s background.

 

Qualities of an investigative reporter
Passion
Says South Africa-based Evelyn Groenink: “Let’s face it, most investigative journalists will never be played by Robert Redford or Cate Blanchett in a Hollywood movie, no matter how brave and important the work they did or do! Most investigative journalism is a thankless endeavour, time- and energy-consuming, that will get your editor impatient and powerful people annoyed with you.
If you like a stable income with regular promotions; if your deepest wish is a management position with matching salary and if you enjoy being invited to dinners and parties given by VIPs in your country or community, then investigative journalism is probably not for you. But if you enjoy challenges, have a passion for truth and justice, and want to serve your readership or audience with stories that matter, no matter how much time and energy it costs you – and even if some powerful people will end up with maybe less-thanfriendly feelings towards you – then, by all means, go for it!”
Curiosity
Asking questions is where investigative journalism starts. The questions can be about events in the news, or about things you see or hear about in your day-to-day life.
Initiative
As we’ve noted, many newsrooms operate on limited resources and all run on tight deadlines. So an investigative idea you mention at a news conference won’t always be instantly adopted, particularly if it is un-formed and vague. You need to take the initiative, do your own preliminary checking and shape the idea into a solid story plan. If your newsroom still isn’t interested, you may need to take further initiative in identifying support (such as an investigative grant) for the work needed. (See Chapters 2-3.)
Logical thinking, organisation and self-discipline
Investigative reporting takes time and, because of the legal risks it often carries, must be verified down to the smallest detail. So you need to become a careful planner to make the best use of your time, and obsessive about checking and re-checking everything you discover, and making sure your story fits together.
Flexibility
An investigation can take unexpected turns. Sometimes the question you began by asking turns out to be a dead-end, or opens the door on another, far more interesting but less obvious question. You need to be prepared to rethink and redesign your research when this happens, and not stay wedded to your first ideas.
Teamworking and communication skills
Movies often portray the investigative reporter as a ‘lone wolf.’ Sometimes, there are situations where secrecy is so important that a story cannot be shared with others until certain safeguards are in place. But very often the best stories come out of a cooperative effort that uses all the available skills in (and even outside) the newsroom. An investigative story may call upon knowledge of anything from science and health to economics and sociology, and no one journalist, however strong their general knowledge, can be an expert in all these. For example, if you are following a paper trail through company audits and no-one in the newsroom has a sophisticated grasp of accounting, you’ll need to identify an expert who can help you. So good contacts and networking form part of your teamwork. And you’ll need to be a good enough communicator to ensure that the team understands the purpose of the story and the standards (accuracy, honesty, confidentiality) expected of everybody on it.
Well-developed reporting skills
This doesn’t mean you have to have a degree in journalism. But you need enough of either training or experience, or both, to know how to identify sources, plan story research, conduct good interviews (and sense when an answer doesn’t ring true), and write accurately and informatively. You also need to know when you are out of your depth, and have the humility to ask for advice or help. If you are relatively inexperienced, good teamworking (again) will help you to tap into the skills of others when this happens. Sometimes, people who don’t have a reporting background do have these skills. Researchers and community workers have often also been trained to interview and identify and sift facts, although they may need the help of newsroom workers to package a story attractively and accessibly for readers, listeners or viewers. We’ll look at effective writing and storytelling techniques in Chapter 7.
Broad general knowledge and good research skills
Understanding the context of your investigation can help you avoid dead-ends and spot relevant facts and questions. But if your investigation takes you into an unfamiliar area, you must be able to familiarise yourself with at least the background, conventions, terminology, role-players and issues of that area quickly. The ability to have a searching, informative conversation with an expert, use computer search engines, or locate and skim-read useful books are all vital here. Above all, you must read – everything, whenever you have the time. You never know when a bit of background will prove useful for your work.
Determination and patience
Investigative reporting will bring you up against all kinds of obstacles, from sources who disappear and records that don’t exist, to editors who want to can the story because it is taking too long or costing too much. Only your own motivation and belief that it is a worthwhile story will carry you through what is often a slow process of discovery.
Fairness and strong ethics
Investigative stories may put the security, jobs or even lives of sources at risk. They also risk putting their subjects at similar risk if reckless accusations are made. So an investigative reporter needs to have a strong, explicitly thought-out set of personal ethics, to ensure that sources and subjects are treated respectfully and as far as possible protected from harm. In addition, newsrooms that support investigative stories need to be guided by ethical codes and have a process in place for discussing and resolving ethical dilemmas. Sometimes public trust is your best protection, and you lose this if you behave unethically. More on this in Chapter 8.
Discretion
Gossips do not make good investigative reporters. As we’ve seen, loose talk can put the investigation – and lives – at risk. But in addition, it can tip off commercial rivals who will then scoop your story, or alert interviewees before you get a chance to talk to them. In a whole range of ways, talking too much can sabotage the story.
Citizenship
IJ’s are often attacked as ‘unpatriotic’, but we do not see our role like that. We believe that what we investigate and discover is driven by concern for the public interest and what will make our community better. Zambia-based Edem Djokotoe warns: “You might have the best research and writing skills in the world, but if you aren’t driven by personal convictions to contribute your skills to your society as a citizen, your story will lack purpose and heart.”
Courage
It isn’t only subjects and sources that are at risk. Reporters may be threatened with legal action or violence, jailed, or even assassinated for their investigations. In the face of these risks, you may succumb to pressure and censor yourself. You need to believe in what you’re doing, have the courage to carry on, and if possible have personal and professional support structures (for example, family or partner, religious community, counsellor, legal advisor, supportive editor and team) in place for when times get tough.

 

http://www.investigative-journalism-africa.info/?page_id=155

Investigate Obama’s Background

Let’s raise up investigative reporters with passion, curiosity, flexibility, self-discipline, and courage who will investigate Barack Obama’s background, such as by calling students and employees, and former students and employees, at Columbia to ask about Obama and his financial aid as a foreign student.

 

Qualities of an investigative reporter
Passion
Says South Africa-based Evelyn Groenink: “Let’s face it, most investigative journalists will never be played by Robert Redford or Cate Blanchett in a Hollywood movie, no matter how brave and important the work they did or do! Most investigative journalism is a thankless endeavour, time- and energy-consuming, that will get your editor impatient and powerful people annoyed with you.
If you like a stable income with regular promotions; if your deepest wish is a management position with matching salary and if you enjoy being invited to dinners and parties given by VIPs in your country or community, then investigative journalism is probably not for you. But if you enjoy challenges, have a passion for truth and justice, and want to serve your readership or audience with stories that matter, no matter how much time and energy it costs you – and even if some powerful people will end up with maybe less-thanfriendly feelings towards you – then, by all means, go for it!”
Curiosity
Asking questions is where investigative journalism starts. The questions can be about events in the news, or about things you see or hear about in your day-to-day life.
Initiative
As we’ve noted, many newsrooms operate on limited resources and all run on tight deadlines. So an investigative idea you mention at a news conference won’t always be instantly adopted, particularly if it is un-formed and vague. You need to take the initiative, do your own preliminary checking and shape the idea into a solid story plan. If your newsroom still isn’t interested, you may need to take further initiative in identifying support (such as an investigative grant) for the work needed. (See Chapters 2-3.)
Logical thinking, organisation and self-discipline
Investigative reporting takes time and, because of the legal risks it often carries, must be verified down to the smallest detail. So you need to become a careful planner to make the best use of your time, and obsessive about checking and re-checking everything you discover, and making sure your story fits together.
Flexibility
An investigation can take unexpected turns. Sometimes the question you began by asking turns out to be a dead-end, or opens the door on another, far more interesting but less obvious question. You need to be prepared to rethink and redesign your research when this happens, and not stay wedded to your first ideas.
Teamworking and communication skills
Movies often portray the investigative reporter as a ‘lone wolf.’ Sometimes, there are situations where secrecy is so important that a story cannot be shared with others until certain safeguards are in place. But very often the best stories come out of a cooperative effort that uses all the available skills in (and even outside) the newsroom. An investigative story may call upon knowledge of anything from science and health to economics and sociology, and no one journalist, however strong their general knowledge, can be an expert in all these. For example, if you are following a paper trail through company audits and no-one in the newsroom has a sophisticated grasp of accounting, you’ll need to identify an expert who can help you. So good contacts and networking form part of your teamwork. And you’ll need to be a good enough communicator to ensure that the team understands the purpose of the story and the standards (accuracy, honesty, confidentiality) expected of everybody on it.
Well-developed reporting skills
This doesn’t mean you have to have a degree in journalism. But you need enough of either training or experience, or both, to know how to identify sources, plan story research, conduct good interviews (and sense when an answer doesn’t ring true), and write accurately and informatively. You also need to know when you are out of your depth, and have the humility to ask for advice or help. If you are relatively inexperienced, good teamworking (again) will help you to tap into the skills of others when this happens. Sometimes, people who don’t have a reporting background do have these skills. Researchers and community workers have often also been trained to interview and identify and sift facts, although they may need the help of newsroom workers to package a story attractively and accessibly for readers, listeners or viewers. We’ll look at effective writing and storytelling techniques in Chapter 7.
Broad general knowledge and good research skills
Understanding the context of your investigation can help you avoid dead-ends and spot relevant facts and questions. But if your investigation takes you into an unfamiliar area, you must be able to familiarise yourself with at least the background, conventions, terminology, role-players and issues of that area quickly. The ability to have a searching, informative conversation with an expert, use computer search engines, or locate and skim-read useful books are all vital here. Above all, you must read – everything, whenever you have the time. You never know when a bit of background will prove useful for your work.
Determination and patience
Investigative reporting will bring you up against all kinds of obstacles, from sources who disappear and records that don’t exist, to editors who want to can the story because it is taking too long or costing too much. Only your own motivation and belief that it is a worthwhile story will carry you through what is often a slow process of discovery.
Fairness and strong ethics
Investigative stories may put the security, jobs or even lives of sources at risk. They also risk putting their subjects at similar risk if reckless accusations are made. So an investigative reporter needs to have a strong, explicitly thought-out set of personal ethics, to ensure that sources and subjects are treated respectfully and as far as possible protected from harm. In addition, newsrooms that support investigative stories need to be guided by ethical codes and have a process in place for discussing and resolving ethical dilemmas. Sometimes public trust is your best protection, and you lose this if you behave unethically. More on this in Chapter 8.
Discretion
Gossips do not make good investigative reporters. As we’ve seen, loose talk can put the investigation – and lives – at risk. But in addition, it can tip off commercial rivals who will then scoop your story, or alert interviewees before you get a chance to talk to them. In a whole range of ways, talking too much can sabotage the story.
Citizenship
IJ’s are often attacked as ‘unpatriotic’, but we do not see our role like that. We believe that what we investigate and discover is driven by concern for the public interest and what will make our community better. Zambia-based Edem Djokotoe warns: “You might have the best research and writing skills in the world, but if you aren’t driven by personal convictions to contribute your skills to your society as a citizen, your story will lack purpose and heart.”
Courage
It isn’t only subjects and sources that are at risk. Reporters may be threatened with legal action or violence, jailed, or even assassinated for their investigations. In the face of these risks, you may succumb to pressure and censor yourself. You need to believe in what you’re doing, have the courage to carry on, and if possible have personal and professional support structures (for example, family or partner, religious community, counsellor, legal advisor, supportive editor and team) in place for when times get tough.

http://www.investigative-journalism-africa.info/?page_id=155

Columbia College is the oldest undergraduate college at Columbia University, situated on the university’s main campus in Morningside Heights in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It was founded in 1754 by the Church of England as King’s College, receiving a Royal Charter from King George II of Great Britain. Columbia College is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York and the fifth oldest in the United States. The college is highly selective in its admissions. For the class of 2015, the college accepted 6.4% of its applicants, the second lowest acceptance rate in the Ivy League and in the country, behind Harvard.

–Wikipedia

Give the People Your College Records, Obama

OBAMA WATCH CENTRAL
HIDDEN RECORDS ‘ONE OF GREAT CONS OF ALL TIMES’
Trump refuses to back down on demand for documents
Published: 08/09/2012 at 8:03 PM

Donald Trump is refusing to back away from his demand that Barack Obama release some of his life’s records, specifically his documentation from his college years, to document whether he is, in fact, eligible to be president.

On the John Gambling Radio Show on WOR NewsTalk Radio 710 in New York this week, Trump said should the Obama documentation prove him ineligible for the office of president, it “could be one of the great cons of all times.”

Trump many times has stated that he believes Obama is hiding information about his past, and has challenged his eligibility under the Constitution’s requirement that a president be a “natural born citizen.”

Then just days ago, Wayne Allyn Root, a former Libertarian vice presidential nominee, wrote in a commentary at The Blaze that he was in the Columbia University class that Obama claims to have been in.

“Obama has a big skeleton in his closet. It’s his college records. Call it ‘gut instinct’ but my gut is almost always right. Obama has a secret hidden at Columbia – and it’s a bad one that threatens to bring down his presidency,” he wrote.

“Here’s my . . . belief. Obama got a leg up by being admitted to both Occidental and Columbia as a foreign exchange student. He was raised as a young boy in Indonesia. But did his mother ever change him back to a U.S. citizen? When he returned to live with his grandparents in Hawaii or as he neared college-age preparing to apply to schools, did he ever change his citizenship back? I’m betting not.

“If you could unseal Obama’s Columbia University records I believe you’d find that.”

Root also noted that while the Obama campaign is demanding that likely GOP nominee Mitt Romney release years of tax records, Obama isn’t forthcoming about his college records.

Trump said the college records are far bigger than tax filings.

“I’ll tell you what. Everyone wants to talk about tax returns. This is bigger than tax returns.

“I think it’s damning. I’ve been saying it for a long time. I mean, he hasn’t proven a thing. This could be one of the great cons of all time so let’s see what happens, but a lot of people want to see those records, and the college records, and in particular the college applications,” he said.

See the exchange:

Questioned by Gambling about what would happen should the records prove Obama as a foreign exchange student.

“Then he’s not president,” Trump said.

And all the legislation he’s signed.

“You have to figure that out,” he said.

“The fact is that he wouldn’t be president for very long. That would be, like I said, one of the great cons ever perpetrated on this country, or anywhere else,” Trump said.

Earlier on Fox News’ “Fox & Friends” program, he said it would be a “great trade” for Obama to open his records and Romney to provide his tax returns.

“I guarantee it would be a really wonderful trade.”

He said, “You know, Obama spent over $4 million in legal fees to keep these things quiet, and then he stands up and says ‘I want to see his tax returns.’ He’s given tax returns. And if they give more – and I understand what Mitt’s saying, they’re very, very complex and 100 percent straight, 100 percent legal – but they look at little nitpicking things, and then you have another month of debate. Now if Obama gives some of his sealed records where all of this money has been spent to keep them sealed, I would certainly make that trade. I think that’s a great trade. … I think you would find some things that are very, very interesting and very shocking.”

It is unclear where Trump learned of the $4 million figure he cites.

However, as WND reported, Robert Bauer is a former partner at Perkins Coie and former top lawyer for Obama, Obama’s presidential campaign, the Democratic National Committee and Obama’s Organizing for America. He is the same lawyer who defended President Obama in lawsuits challenging his eligibility to be president.

In 2009, WND reported Obama had paid Perkins Coie, a single law firm, $2.6 million between the time he announced his campaign for presidency and November 2009, the month Bauer left his position at Perkins Coie to become White House counsel. (By contrast, a cumulative total of all of Sen. John McCain’s legal consulting fees, from Jan. 1, 2007, to October 2009, amounted to only $1.6 million.)

WND also reported that Bauer sent a letter to plaintiff Gregory Hollister, a retired Air Force colonel, of Hollister v. Soetoro, threatening sanctions if he didn’t withdraw his appeal of the eligibility case that earlier was tossed by a district judge because the issue already had been “twittered.”

“For the reasons stated in Judge Robertson’s ruling, the suit is frivolous and should not be pursued,” Bauer’s letter warned. “Should you decline to withdraw this frivolous appeal, please be informed that we intend to pursue sanctions, including costs, expenses, and attorneys’ fees, pursuant to Federal Rule of Appellate Procedure 38 and D.C. Circuit Rule 38.”

Bauer had also represented Obama and the DNC in Philip Berg’s eligibility lawsuit and various other legal challenges.

Obama’s payments to Perkins Coie covered a variety of legal expenses – not just expenses related to eligibility lawsuits. (Since the FEC isn’t legally required to provide specific details on its forms, Obama’s payment records do not spell out the exact amount he spent on representation in eligibility lawsuits.)

According to a 2011 Roll Call report, DNC National Press Secretary Hari Sevugan claimed Obama “incurred ordinary legal expenses . . . which are proportional to the unprecedented size of this campaign.”

However, the report noted, “Sevugan said some legal fees were needed to defend the campaign against ‘unmeritorious’ suits, including one challenging Obama’s citizenship.”

Trump told “Fox & Friends,” “He’s spending millions of dollars in legal fees to hide it, and most of the presidents, by the way, have released their college applications and their college records. And a lot of questions are being raised by a lot of different people.”

Investigate Obama’s Background

Let’s raise up investigative reporters with passion, curiosity, flexibility, self-discipline, and courage who will investigate Barack Obama’s background.

 

Qualities of an investigative reporter
Passion
Says South Africa-based Evelyn Groenink: “Let’s face it, most investigative journalists will never be played by Robert Redford or Cate Blanchett in a Hollywood movie, no matter how brave and important the work they did or do! Most investigative journalism is a thankless endeavour, time- and energy-consuming, that will get your editor impatient and powerful people annoyed with you.
If you like a stable income with regular promotions; if your deepest wish is a management position with matching salary and if you enjoy being invited to dinners and parties given by VIPs in your country or community, then investigative journalism is probably not for you. But if you enjoy challenges, have a passion for truth and justice, and want to serve your readership or audience with stories that matter, no matter how much time and energy it costs you – and even if some powerful people will end up with maybe less-thanfriendly feelings towards you – then, by all means, go for it!”
Curiosity
Asking questions is where investigative journalism starts. The questions can be about events in the news, or about things you see or hear about in your day-to-day life.
Initiative
As we’ve noted, many newsrooms operate on limited resources and all run on tight deadlines. So an investigative idea you mention at a news conference won’t always be instantly adopted, particularly if it is un-formed and vague. You need to take the initiative, do your own preliminary checking and shape the idea into a solid story plan. If your newsroom still isn’t interested, you may need to take further initiative in identifying support (such as an investigative grant) for the work needed. (See Chapters 2-3.)
Logical thinking, organisation and self-discipline
Investigative reporting takes time and, because of the legal risks it often carries, must be verified down to the smallest detail. So you need to become a careful planner to make the best use of your time, and obsessive about checking and re-checking everything you discover, and making sure your story fits together.
Flexibility
An investigation can take unexpected turns. Sometimes the question you began by asking turns out to be a dead-end, or opens the door on another, far more interesting but less obvious question. You need to be prepared to rethink and redesign your research when this happens, and not stay wedded to your first ideas.
Teamworking and communication skills
Movies often portray the investigative reporter as a ‘lone wolf.’ Sometimes, there are situations where secrecy is so important that a story cannot be shared with others until certain safeguards are in place. But very often the best stories come out of a cooperative effort that uses all the available skills in (and even outside) the newsroom. An investigative story may call upon knowledge of anything from science and health to economics and sociology, and no one journalist, however strong their general knowledge, can be an expert in all these. For example, if you are following a paper trail through company audits and no-one in the newsroom has a sophisticated grasp of accounting, you’ll need to identify an expert who can help you. So good contacts and networking form part of your teamwork. And you’ll need to be a good enough communicator to ensure that the team understands the purpose of the story and the standards (accuracy, honesty, confidentiality) expected of everybody on it.
Well-developed reporting skills
This doesn’t mean you have to have a degree in journalism. But you need enough of either training or experience, or both, to know how to identify sources, plan story research, conduct good interviews (and sense when an answer doesn’t ring true), and write accurately and informatively. You also need to know when you are out of your depth, and have the humility to ask for advice or help. If you are relatively inexperienced, good teamworking (again) will help you to tap into the skills of others when this happens. Sometimes, people who don’t have a reporting background do have these skills. Researchers and community workers have often also been trained to interview and identify and sift facts, although they may need the help of newsroom workers to package a story attractively and accessibly for readers, listeners or viewers. We’ll look at effective writing and storytelling techniques in Chapter 7.
Broad general knowledge and good research skills
Understanding the context of your investigation can help you avoid dead-ends and spot relevant facts and questions. But if your investigation takes you into an unfamiliar area, you must be able to familiarise yourself with at least the background, conventions, terminology, role-players and issues of that area quickly. The ability to have a searching, informative conversation with an expert, use computer search engines, or locate and skim-read useful books are all vital here. Above all, you must read – everything, whenever you have the time. You never know when a bit of background will prove useful for your work.
Determination and patience
Investigative reporting will bring you up against all kinds of obstacles, from sources who disappear and records that don’t exist, to editors who want to can the story because it is taking too long or costing too much. Only your own motivation and belief that it is a worthwhile story will carry you through what is often a slow process of discovery.
Fairness and strong ethics
Investigative stories may put the security, jobs or even lives of sources at risk. They also risk putting their subjects at similar risk if reckless accusations are made. So an investigative reporter needs to have a strong, explicitly thought-out set of personal ethics, to ensure that sources and subjects are treated respectfully and as far as possible protected from harm. In addition, newsrooms that support investigative stories need to be guided by ethical codes and have a process in place for discussing and resolving ethical dilemmas. Sometimes public trust is your best protection, and you lose this if you behave unethically. More on this in Chapter 8.
Discretion
Gossips do not make good investigative reporters. As we’ve seen, loose talk can put the investigation – and lives – at risk. But in addition, it can tip off commercial rivals who will then scoop your story, or alert interviewees before you get a chance to talk to them. In a whole range of ways, talking too much can sabotage the story.
Citizenship
IJ’s are often attacked as ‘unpatriotic’, but we do not see our role like that. We believe that what we investigate and discover is driven by concern for the public interest and what will make our community better. Zambia-based Edem Djokotoe warns: “You might have the best research and writing skills in the world, but if you aren’t driven by personal convictions to contribute your skills to your society as a citizen, your story will lack purpose and heart.”
Courage
It isn’t only subjects and sources that are at risk. Reporters may be threatened with legal action or violence, jailed, or even assassinated for their investigations. In the face of these risks, you may succumb to pressure and censor yourself. You need to believe in what you’re doing, have the courage to carry on, and if possible have personal and professional support structures (for example, family or partner, religious community, counsellor, legal advisor, supportive editor and team) in place for when times get tough.

http://www.investigative-journalism-africa.info/?page_id=155

Columbia College is the oldest undergraduate college at Columbia University, situated on the university’s main campus in Morningside Heights in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It was founded in 1754 by the Church of England as King’s College, receiving a Royal Charter from King George II of Great Britain. Columbia College is the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York and the fifth oldest in the United States. The college is highly selective in its admissions. For the class of 2015, the college accepted 6.4% of its applicants, the second lowest acceptance rate in the Ivy League and in the country, behind Harvard.

–Wikipedia

 

Home Means Nevada

Home Means Nevada

Way out in the land of the setting sun,
Where the wind blows wild and free,
There’s a lovely spot, just the only one
That means home sweet home to me.
If you follow the old Kit Carson trail,
Until desert meets the hills,
Oh you certainly will agree with me,
It’s the place of a thousand thrills.
Home, means Nevada,
Home, means the hills,
Home, means the sage and the pine.
Out by the Truckee’s silvery rills,
Out where the sun always shines,
There is the land that I love the best,
Fairer than all I can see.
Right in the heart of the golden west
Home, means Nevada to me.

Whenever the sun at the close of day,
Colors all the western sky,
Oh my heart returns to the desert grey
And the mountains tow’ring high.
Where the moon beams play in shadowed glen,
With the spotted fawn and doe,
All the live long night until morning light,
Is the loveliest place I know.
Home, means Nevada,
Home, means the hills,
Home, means the sage and the pines.
Out by the Truckee’s silvery rills,
Out where the sun always shines,
There is the land that I love the best,
Fairer than all I can see.
Right in the heart of the golden west
Home, means Nevada to me.

~Written by Bertha Rafetto in 1932 and officially adopted by the Nevada Legislature in 1933.