Learn a Lot: Day’s Books

Cheer up.

Go read a book:

You’ll benefit;

You’ll smile to read

Some grit and wit.

~Day

I’ve rendered the Holy Bible in blank verse.  All the books are on Kindle. I’ve written books of poetry, a children’s story, compiled a law book, and compiled books of quotations. The royalties go directly to my local church, The Bridge Church, in Carson City, Nevada.

 

Besides my books on amazon and kindle, I have art and photographs for sale at fineartamerica.com and zazzle.com/daysrays, and on display on flickr.

my legal website: cclegal.pro

Facebook: “Day Williams” and “Day’s World”

Twitter: Day’s World

~Day Williams

directorday37@gmail.com

Legal communications only: day_williams@sbcglobal.net

“With Usura” by Ezra Pound

Canto XLV

BY EZRA POUND

With Usura
 
With usura hath no man a house of good stone
each block cut smooth and well fitting
that design might cover their face,
with usura
hath no man a painted paradise on his church wall
harpes et luz
or where virgin receiveth message
and halo projects from incision,
with usura
seeth no man Gonzaga his heirs and his concubines
no picture is made to endure nor to live with
but it is made to sell and sell quickly
with usura, sin against nature,
is thy bread ever more of stale rags
is thy bread dry as paper,
with no mountain wheat, no strong flour
with usura the line grows thick
with usura is no clear demarcation
and no man can find site for his dwelling.
Stonecutter is kept from his tone
weaver is kept from his loom
WITH USURA
wool comes not to market
sheep bringeth no gain with usura
Usura is a murrain, usura
blunteth the needle in the maid’s hand
and stoppeth the spinner’s cunning. Pietro Lombardo
came not by usura
Duccio came not by usura
nor Pier della Francesca; Zuan Bellin’ not by usura
nor was ‘La Calunnia’ painted.
Came not by usura Angelico; came not Ambrogio Praedis,
Came no church of cut stone signed: Adamo me fecit.
Not by usura St. Trophime
Not by usura Saint Hilaire,
Usura rusteth the chisel
It rusteth the craft and the craftsman
It gnaweth the thread in the loom
None learneth to weave gold in her pattern;
Azure hath a canker by usura; cramoisi is unbroidered
Emerald findeth no Memling
Usura slayeth the child in the womb
It stayeth the young man’s courting
It hath brought palsey to bed, lyeth
between the young bride and her bridegroom
                               CONTRA NATURAM
They have brought whores for Eleusis
Corpses are set to banquet
at behest of usura.
N.B. Usury: A charge for the use of purchasing power, levied without regard to production; often without regard to the possibilities of production. (Hence the failure of the Medici bank.)

Ezra Pound, “Canto XLV ” from The Cantos of Ezra Pound. Copyright © 1993 by Ezra Pound. Reprinted by permission of New Directions Publishing Corporation.

Source: Cantos of Ezra Pound (New Directions Publishing Corporation, 1993)

January 8: Poets

January
January 8
Poets

22.

I’m living so far beyond my income that we may almost be said to be living apart.

~William Cowper (1731–1800), English poet and hymnodist

23.

Modern poets talk against business, poor things, but all of us write for money. Beginners are subjected to trial by market.

~Robert Lee Frost (1874–1963), American poet who received four Pulitzer Prizes for Poetry.

24.

A bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back when it begins to rain.

~Robert Lee Frost

Money Matters.05b

Day’s Books

I wrote some books

To grow your mind;

Read one or two—

It’s not a grind.

~Day Williams

Collect the entire set.

Most books are available on amazon.com.

Buy Day’s Books

The world will never starve for want of wonders, but only for want of wonder.
~G.K. Chesterton in Tremendous Trifles

Day Aussie hat 2mb

Day Williams

Books by Day Williams

New children’s book: Tahoe Tobin

First Thursday -1future 2mbMasons Mystery2 1mbWe_the_People_cover4_2mbTomb of the Unknown SoldierStatue of Lady Justice, Virginia City, NevadaMining Rig, Virginia City, NevadaDavid KingYes cover1001_Quotations_Bible_Passages_smlVirginia_Street_2mb5 1001 book covers.2mb3_book_covers_2mbLeadville Parade Blurb cover 2mbBridgeport parade cover1.2mbLincoln Memorial in Washington D.C.New Testament blank verse 2mbTreasury of Christian Poetry_2mb

Tahoe Tobin

Buy my books.

January 2: “The President” by Day Williams

THE PRESIDENT

 

To lead a nation means to sacrifice

The private life, where joy and calm increase,

For open hell and public paradise,

With every word and act a centerpiece.

 

The President‘s an anchor and a light,

The man who executes the rules and codes,

Commander of the military might,

A guard of freedom, pioneer of roads.

 

Without a vision people fall and die,

Without good leaders nations will decay,

But when the trust’s in God, He’ll multiply

His blessings to the people’s work and play.

 

May God provide a ruler to preside

With dreams and deeds that push the past aside.

“If” by Rudyard Kipling

If—

BY RUDYARD KIPLING

(‘Brother Square-Toes’—Rewards and Fairies)

If you can keep your head when all about you
    Are losing theirs and blaming it on you,
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
    But make allowance for their doubting too;
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
    Or being lied about, don’t deal in lies,
Or being hated, don’t give way to hating,
    And yet don’t look too good, nor talk too wise:
If you can dream—and not make dreams your master;
    If you can think—and not make thoughts your aim;
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
    And treat those two impostors just the same;
If you can bear to hear the truth you’ve spoken
    Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
    And stoop and build ’em up with worn-out tools:
If you can make one heap of all your winnings
    And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings
    And never breathe a word about your loss;
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
    To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
    Except the Will which says to them: ‘Hold on!’
If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
    Or walk with Kings—nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
    If all men count with you, but none too much;
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
    With sixty seconds’ worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything that’s in it,
    And—which is more—you’ll be a Man, my son!

Source: A Choice of Kipling’s Verse (1943)

***

A Victorian snapshot of manhood.

What is manhood today? Womanhood?

What does Kipling include that is not necessary to attain full maturity?

What does he omit?

Write your own poem about maturity.

 

December 27: “And Death Shall Have No Dominion”

And death shall have no dominion.
Dead men naked they shall be one
With the man in the wind and the west moon;
When their bones are picked clean and the clean bones gone,
They shall have stars at elbow and foot;
Though they go mad they shall be sane,
Though they sink through the sea they shall rise again;
Though lovers be lost love shall not;
And death shall have no dominion.

And death shall have no dominion.
Under the windings of the sea
They lying long shall not die windily;
Twisting on racks when sinews give way,
Strapped to a wheel, yet they shall not break;
Faith in their hands shall snap in two,
And the unicorn evils run them through;
Split all ends up they shan’t crack;
And death shall have no dominion.

And death shall have no dominion.
No more may gulls cry at their ears
Or waves break loud on the seashores;
Where blew a flower may a flower no more
Lift its head to the blows of the rain;
Though they be mad and dead as nails,
Heads of the characters hammer through daisies;
Break in the sun till the sun breaks down,
And death shall have no dominion.