Feb. 4: Napoleon Hill

February 4

Napoleon Hill

 

95.

Your ability to use the principle of autosuggestion will depend, very largely, upon your capacity to concentrate upon a given desire until that desire becomes a burning obsession.

~Napoleon Hill

 

96.

Your big opportunity may be right where you are now.

~Napoleon Hill

97.

There is one quality which one must possess to win, and that is definiteness of purpose, the knowledge of what one wants, and a burning desire to possess it.

~Napoleon Hill

Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C.

 

Obama’s civilian security force: Dear Leader wants a police state

BETWEEN THE LINES
WHY IS GOVERNMENT STOCKPILING GUNS, AMMO?
Exclusive: Joseph Farah examines Obama’s plan for ‘civilian national security force’
Published: 18 hours ago
by JOSEPH FARAH Email | Archive

Joseph Farah is founder, editor and CEO of WND and a nationally syndicated columnist with Creators Syndicate. He is the author or co-author of 13 books, including his latest, “The Tea Party Manifesto,” and his classic, “Taking America Back,” now in its third edition and 14th printing. Farah is the former editor of the legendary Sacramento Union and other major-market dailies.

 

Is the U.S. government getting ready for a war we don’t know about?

And, if that’s why Washington is stockpiling massive amounts of ammunition (hollow points, by the way), why is Homeland Security doing the buying instead of the Defense Department?

I have some theories.

Many of you will remember a story I broke a long time ago – about presidential candidate Barack Obama’s little-noticed announcement that, if elected in 2008, he wanted to create a “civilian national security force” as big, as strong and as well-funded as the Defense Department.

Here’s what he actually said at a campaign stop in Colorado July 2, 2008: “We cannot continue to rely only on our military in order to achieve the national security objectives we’ve set. We’ve got to have a civilian national security force that’s just as powerful, just as strong, just as well-funded.”
Want to make sure you and your family are fully protected? Check out our self-defense section in WND’s Superstore.

Could what we see happening now in the Department of Homeland Security be the beginning of Obama’s dream and our constitutional nightmare?

We’ve learned more about Obama’s vision since then. Maybe it’s time for a review:

He made the campaign promise to build this $439 billion domestic army, but all references to the initiative were inexplicably deleted from the copy of his speech posted on his website while others mysteriously disappeared from transcripts of the speech distributed by the campaign. That was strange – and ominous.
At the time, I had never heard anyone use the phrase “civilian national security force” before. But I did a little homework and found out where it originated. It was first proposed by then Bush administration Defense Secretary Robert Gates. On that basis alone, I accurately predicted that, if elected, Obama would name Gates as his own defense secretary. Needless to say, when that appointment came to pass, no media outlet bothered to interview me about my foresight.
Still during the campaign of 2008, I suggested that what Obama had in mind might be something very sinister indeed – perhaps “some kind of domestic Big Brother program.”
We never heard another mention of Obama’s “civilian national security force” again. Not in 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 or 2012.

But that brings us up to 2013 and the highly unusual stockpiling of firearms and ammo by Homeland Security – firearms and ammo that Obama would like to deny to ordinary citizens who are not members of his domestic army.

Well, I hate to say it, but I may have predicted this, too.

In a Halloween column last fall, I stated that, if re-elected, Obama would “declare a full-scale war on his domestic opposition.”

I wasn’t joking. I was deadly serious – so serious, in fact, that I did something I pledged I would never do: Vote for Mitt Romney. It was a matter of self-defense and self-preservation. I said then that a second term of Obama might mean we would never see another free and fair election in America. (I’m not even sure we saw one in 2012.) I suggested due process would go the way of the horse and buggy. I said I expected Obama would move to shut down or destroy all independent media. I even speculated that his biggest critics would eventually be rounded up in the name of national security.

Think about it.

Why does the civilian Department of Homeland Security need billions of rounds of ammunition?

This is the agency that is responsible for policing the border. But it doesn’t.

This is the agency that is responsible for catching terrorists. But it doesn’t.

So why does Homeland Security need so many weapons and enough hollow-point rounds to plug every American six times?

Maybe this is the “civilian national security force that’s just as powerful, just as strong, just as well-funded” as the Defense Department.

These words – “civilian national security force” – have haunted me ever since I first read them.

Obama has never explained what he meant.

He’s never been called to account for that remark.

Doesn’t this sound like police-state talk to you?

The U.S. Army alone has nearly 500,000 troops. That doesn’t count reserves or National Guard. In 2007, the U.S. defense budget was $439 billion. No one knows what the budget is today because Congress stopped passing budgets when Obama took office.

Is Obama serious about creating some kind of domestic security force bigger and more expensive than that? Is this part of his second-term agenda?

He has also set up, as I have reported, a new homeland security bureaucracy to operate under his own direction.

I think it’s worth recalling here that just over a year ago both houses of Congress unwisely passed the defense reauthorization bill that killed the concept of habeas corpus – legislation that authorized the president to use the U.S. military to arrest and indefinitely detain American citizens without charge or trial.

That legislation would empower a lame-duck Obama to use all of the power of the federal government – constitutional and unconstitutional – to target his political enemies.

If any Republican, conservative, independent journalist, pro-life activist, returning veteran, gun-rights activist, constitutionalist, Bible believer or critic of Obama thinks they will be safe in a second term under this would-be despot, they had better think again – real fast.

The “civilian national security force” is not here to protect any of them. It’s here to destroy the opposition. It’s here to destroy liberty. It’s here to destroy the Constitution.
Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2013/02/why-is-government-stockpiling-guns-ammo/#XvYFSmK2xbdBAO30.99

 

prison by Dees

Feb. 4: Confusion

February 4

 

Confusion

 

94.

None of you know

or understand a thing.

You live in darkness,

while the foundations

of the earth tremble.

–Psalms 82:5

 

95.

Nothing makes sense!

Everything is nonsense.

I have seen it all–

nothing makes sense!

–Ecclesiastes 1:2

 

96.

No one has come to defend us

or to bring about justice.

We hoped for a day of sunshine,

but all we found

was a dark, gloomy night.

We feel our way along,

as if we were blind;

we stumble at noon,

as if it were night.

We can see no better

 

than someone dead.

–Isaiah 59:9-10

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1001 Quotations®: The Future by Day Williams

129.
The dinosaurs disappeared because they could not adapt to their changing environment. We shall disappear if we cannot adapt to an environment that now contains spaceships, computers — and thermonuclear weapons.
~Arthur C. Clarke, Foreword to The Collected Stories (June 2000)

130.
Perhaps it is better to be un-sane and happy, than sane and un-happy. But it is the best of all to be sane and happy. Whether our descendants can achieve that goal will be the greatest challenge of the future. Indeed, it may well decide whether we have any future.
~Arthur C. Clarke. Sir Arthur Charles Clarke (1917 – 2008) was a British author, inventor and futurist.
February 16
War and Peace

131.
Studies by Medical Corps psychiatrists of combat fatigue cases . . . found that fear of killing, rather than fear of being killed, was the most common cause of battle failure, and that fear of failure ran a strong second.
~S.L.A. Marshall

132.
You’re an old-timer if you can remember when setting the world on fire was a figure of speech.
~Franklin P. Jones, referring to the atomic bomb

133.
A visitor from Mars could easily pick out the civilized nations. They have the best implements of war.
~Herbert V. Prochnow (1897 – 1998), U.S. banking executive, noted toastmaster, and author during the middle 20th Century. As Vice President of the First National Bank of Chicago, Prochnow wrote several popular books on public speaking. He also wrote epigrams and anecdotes that appeared in The Saturday Evening Post and Reader’s Digest.
February 17
Holy Bible

134.
Surely he took up our infirmities and carried our sorrows, yet we considered him
stricken by God, smitten by him, and afflicted. But he was pierced for our transgressions,
he was crushed for our iniquities; the punishment that brought us peace was upon him, and
by his wounds we are healed. We all, like sheep, have gone astray, each of us has turned to
his own way; and the LORD has laid on him the iniquity of us all.
~Isaiah 53:4-6

135.
And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and supplication. They will look on me, the one they have pierced, and they will mourn for him as one mourns for an only child, and grieve bitterly for him as one grieves for a firstborn son.
~Zechariah 12:10
February 18
Science Fiction Writers

136.
For if a man could look ahead and see some of the things that no doubt were going to happen, how could he be happy?
~Clifford D. Simak, “Sunspot Purge” (1940)

137.
Is there anything to add to that preface now? Nothing except my epitaph. That, when the time comes, will manifestly have to be: “I told you so. You damned fools.” (The italics are mine.)
~H.G. Wells, Preface, “The War in the Air, and Particularly How Mr. Bert Smallways Fared While It Lasted“ (1941)
February 19
Robots and UFOs

138.
Making realistic robots is going to polarize the market, if you will. You will
have some people who love it and some people who will really be disturbed. . . . If you
make [robots] perfectly realistic, you trigger this body-snatcher fear in some people.
~David Hanson, CNN.com, Nov. 23, 2006

139.

Of course the flying saucers are real and they are interplanetary. . . . The cumulative evidence for the existence of UFOs is quite overwhelming and I accept the fact of their existence.
~Air Chief Marshal Lord Dowding, Royal Air Force (RAF), August 1954
February 20
Change

140.
The role of the artist is to create an Anti-environment as a means of perception and adjustment. Marshall McLuhan, The Book of Probes : Marshall McLuhan, designed by David Carson, edited by Marshall McLuhan project, W. Terrance Gordon, Eric McLuhan, Philip B. Meggs, p. 31.

141.
Every mode of technology is a reflex of our most intimate psychological experience.
~Marshall McLuhan, The Book of Probes : Marshall McLuhan, designed by David Carson, edited by Marshall McLuhan project, W. Terrance Gordon, Eric McLuhan, Philip B. Meggs, p. 171.

142.
Great ages of innovation are the ages in which entire cultures are junked or scrapped.
~Marsh all McLuhan, The Book of Probes : Marshall McLuhan, designed by David Carson, edited by Marshall McLuhan project, W. Terrance Gordon, Eric McLuhan, Philip B. Meggs, p. 309.
February 21
Physicists

143.
Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.
~Marie Curie

144.
God runs electromagnetics by wave theory on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, and the Devil runs them by quantum theory on Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday.
~Sir William Bragg

145.
The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement. But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.
~Niels Bohr
February 22
Humor

146.
The time-traveling is just too dangerous. Better that I devote myself to study the other great mystery of the universe: women!
~Doc Brown, Back to the Future Part II. Back to the Future Part II is a 1989 sequel to Back to the Future. After visiting 2015, Marty McFly must repeat his visit to 1955 to prevent disastrous changes to 1985 . . . without interfering with his first trip.

147.
1955 Doc: It was nice talking to you. Maybe again we’ll bump into each other sometime in the future.
1985 Doc: Or the past.
~Back to the Future Part II

future 2mb

1001 Quotations®: The Future by Day Williams

future 2mb

 
February 8
Humor

107.
The truth of a proposition has nothing to do with its credibility. And vice versa.
~Robert A. Heinlein, Time Enough for Love (1973)

108.
Computer games don’t affect kids, I mean if Pac Man affected us as kids, we’d all be running around in darkened rooms, munching pills and listening to repetitive music.
~Marcus Brigstocke (falsely attributed to Kristian Wilson, Nintendo Inc.)

108.
Some people insist that “mediocre” is better than “best.” They delight in clipping wings because they themselves can’t fly. They despise brains because they have none. Pfah!
~Robert A. Heinlein, Have Space Suit—Will Travel (1958)
February 9
Physicists

110.
The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them.
~Sir William Bragg. Sir William Henry Bragg (1862 – 1942) was a British physicist, chemist, mathematician and active sportsman who uniquely shared a Nobel Prize with his son William Lawrence Bragg − the 1915 Nobel Prize in Physics.

111.
We must not forget that when radium was discovered no one knew that it would prove useful in hospitals. The work was one of pure science. And this is a proof that scientific work must not be considered from the point of view of the direct usefulness of it. It must be done for itself, for the beauty of science, and then there is always the chance that a scientific discovery may become like the radium a benefit for humanity.
~Marie Curie. Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867 – 1934) was a Polish physicist and chemist, working mainly in France, who is famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the only woman to win in two fields, and the only person to win in multiple sciences. She was also the first female professor at the University of Paris (La Sorbonne), and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in Paris’ Panthéon.
February 10
Humor

112.
Marty: Wait a minute. Wait a minute Doc, uh, are you telling me you built a time machine . . . out of a DeLorean?
Doc: The way I see it, if you’re going to build a time machine into a car, why not do it with some style?
~Back to the Future, a 1985 film about time travel. After traveling back to 1955, Marty McFly accidentally interferes with his parents’ courtship and must make them fall in love . . . or else he will never be born. Directed by Robert Zemeckis. Written by Robert Zemeckis and Bob Gale.

113.
Marty: Are you trying to tell me that my mother has got the hots for me?
Doc: Precisely!
Marty: Whoa, this is heavy.
Doc: There’s that word again: “heavy.” Why are things so heavy in the future? Is there a problem with the Earth’s gravitational pull?
~Back to the Future
February 11
Predictions

114.
While theoretically and technically television may be feasible, commercially and financially I consider it an impossibility, a development of which we need waste little time dreaming.
~Lee De Forest (1873 – 1961), American inventor. One of the fathers of the electronic age, he is credited with fundamental contributions to radio and to sound in motion pictures.

115.
Everything that can be invented, has been invented.
~Charles H. Duell, 1899. [Duell was the commissioner of the U.S. Patent Office.]
February 12
Space Travel

116.
In spite of the opinions of certain narrow-minded people, who would shut up the human race upon this globe, as within some magic circle which it must never outstep, we shall one day travel to the moon, the planets, and the stars, with the same facility, rapidity, and certainty as we now make the voyage from Liverpool to New York!
~Jules Verne, From the Earth to the Moon (1865), Ch. XIX: “A Monster Meeting“ (Charles Scribner’s Sons “Uniform Edition,” 1890, p. 93)

117.
Some say that we should stop exploring space, that the cost in human lives is too great. But Columbia’s crew would not have wanted that. We are a curious species, always wanting to know what is over the next hill, around the next corner, on the next island. And we have been that way for thousands of years.
~Stuart Atkinson, New Mars, Mar. 7, 2003

118.
Only via continuing to probe every nook and cranny of the universe that is accessible to us will we truly build a useful appreciation of our own place in the cosmos.
~Lawrence M. Krauss, A Universe from Nothing. Lawrence Maxwell Krauss (born May 27, 1954) is a Canadian-American theoretical physicist and cosmologist who is a professor of physics, Foundation Professor of the School of Earth and Space Exploration, and director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University. He is the author of several bestselling books, including The Physics of Star Trek and A Universe from Nothing. He is an advocate of scientific skepticism, science education, and the science of morality.
February 13
Scientists

119.
Civilization is in no immediate danger of running out of energy or even just out of
oil. But we are running out of environment—that is, out of the capacity of the environment
to absorb energy’s impacts without risk of intolerable disruption—and our heavy
dependence on oil in particular entails not only environmental but also economic and
political liabilities.
~Vijay V. Vaitheeswaran, Power to the People: How the Coming Energy Revolution will Transform an Industry, Change our Lives, and Maybe Even Save the Planet (2003).

120.
[N]either is it possible to discover the more remote and deeper parts of any science,
if you stand but upon the level of the same science, and ascend not to a higher science.
~Sir Francis Bacon, Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu
(Ed.), The Works of Francis Bacon (1852), Vol. 1, p. 173.
February 14
Writers

122.
A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die gallantly. Specialization is for insects
~Robert A. Heinlein, Time Enough for Love (1973). Robert Anson Heinlein (1907 – 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of science fiction of the 20th Century.

123.
Do not confuse “duty” with what other people expect of you; they are utterly different. Duty is a debt you owe to yourself to fulfill obligations you have assumed voluntarily. Paying that debt can entail anything from years of patient work to instant willingness to die. Difficult it may be, but the reward is self-respect.
~Robert A. Heinlein, Time Enough for Love (1973).

124.
Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites. Moderation is for monks.
~Robert A. Heinlein, Time Enough for Love (1973).

125.
Expertise in one field does not carry over into other fields. But experts often think so. The narrower their field of knowledge the more likely they are to think so.
~Robert A. Heinlein, Time Enough for Love (1973).
February 15
Futurists

126.
You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.
~R. Buckminster Fuller. Richard Buckminster Fuller (1895 – 1983) was an American philosopher, systems theorist, architect, and inventor, known to many of his friends and fans as “Bucky” Fuller. He created and popularized terms such as “Spaceship Earth,” ephemeralization, and synergetics. He also developed numerous inventions, mainly architectural designs, the most famous of which is the geodesic dome.

127.
I can never look now at the Milky Way without wondering from which of those banked clouds of stars the emissaries are coming. If you will pardon so commonplace a simile, we have set off the fire alarm and have nothing to do but to wait. I do not think we will have to wait for long
~Arthur C. Clarke, “The Sentinel“ (1948), original titled “Sentinel of Eternity“ this is the short story which later provided the fundamental ideas for 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) written by Clarke and Stanley Kubrick.

128.
Others, one suspects, are afraid that the crossing of space, and above all contact with intelligent but nonhuman races, may destroy the foundations of their religious faith. They may be right, but in any event their attitude is one which does not bear logical examination — for a faith which cannot survive collision with the truth is not worth many regrets.
~Arthur C. Clarke, The Exploration of Space (1951)

129.
The dinosaurs disappeared because they could not adapt to their changing environment. We shall disappear if we cannot adapt to an environment that now contains spaceships, computers — and thermonuclear weapons.
~Arthur C. Clarke, Foreword to The Collected Stories (June 2000)

130.
Perhaps it is better to be un-sane and happy, than sane and un-happy. But it is the best of all to be sane and happy. Whether our descendants can achieve that goal will be the greatest challenge of the future. Indeed, it may well decide whether we have any future.
~Arthur C. Clarke. Sir Arthur Charles Clarke (1917 – 2008) was a British author, inventor and futurist.

 

1001 Quotations®: The Future by Day Williams

Day Aussie hat 2mb
96.
But the nearer the dawn the darker the night,
And by going wrong all things come right;
Things have been mended that were worse,
And the worse, the nearer they are to mend.
~Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Tales of a Wayside Inn (1863−1874), “The Baron of St. Castine,” line 265.

97.
Do not think that years leave us and find us the same!
~Owen Meredith (Lord Lytton), Lucile (1860), Part II, Canto II, Stanza 3.
February 5
Physicists

98.
In any field, find the strangest thing and then explore it.
~John Archibald Wheeler

99.
The questions worth asking, in other words, come not from other people but from nature, and are for the most part delicate things easily drowned out by the noise of everyday life.
~Robert B. Laughlin

100.
Behind it all is surely an idea so simple, so beautiful, that when we grasp it − in a decade, a century, or a millennium − we will all say to each other, how could it have been otherwise? How could we have been so stupid?
~John Archibald Wheeler. John Archibald Wheeler (1911 – 2008) was an eminent American theoretical physicist. One of the later collaborators of Albert Einstein, he tried to achieve Einstein’s vision of a unified field theory. He is also known for having coined the terms “black hole” and “wormhole” and the phrase “it from bit.”
February 6
Humor

101.
Never underestimate the power of human stupidity.
~Robert A. Heinlein, Time Enough for Love (1973). Robert Anson Heinlein (1907 – 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of science fiction of the 20th Century.
102.
Political tags — such as royalist, communist, democrat, populist, fascist, liberal, conservative, and so forth — are never basic criteria. The human race divides politically into those who want people to be controlled and those who have no such desire. The former are idealists acting from highest motives for the greatest good of the greatest number. The latter are surly curmudgeons, suspicious and lacking in altruism. But they are more comfortable neighbors than the other sort.
~Robert A. Heinlein, Time Enough for Love (1973)

103.
The future is called perhaps, which is the only possible thing to call the future. And the only important thing is not to allow that to scare you.
~Tennessee Williams, Orpheus Descending, 1957
February 7
Songs and Poems

104.
Full fathom five thy father lies;
Of his bones are coral made;
Those are pearls that were his eyes:
Nothing of him that doth fade,
But doth suffer a sea-change
Into something rich and strange.
~William Shakespeare, The Tempest (c. 1610-1612), Act I, scene 2, line 396.

105.
Come gather round people wherever you roam
And admit that the waters around you have grown
And accept it that soon you will be drenched to the bone
If your time to you time is worth saving
You’d better start swimming or you’ll sink like a stone
For the times, they are a’ changin’.
~Bob Dylan, “The Times They Are A-Changin’ “. Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman; May 24, 1941) is an American musician and singer-songwriter. He has been an influential figure in popular music and culture for more than five decades. Much of his most celebrated work dates from the 1960s when he was an informal chronicler and a seemingly reluctant figurehead of social unrest. A number of Dylan’s early songs, such as “Blowin’ in the Wind“ and “The Times They Are a-Changin’,” became anthems for the US civil rights and anti-war movements.

106.
Non sum qualis eram.
I am not what I once was.
~Horace, Carmina, IV. 1. 3. Quintus Horatius Flaccus (65 B.C. – 8 B.C.), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus. The rhetorician Quintillian regarded his Odes as just about the only Latin lyrics worth reading: “He can be lofty sometimes, yet he is also full of charm and grace, versatile in his figures, and felicitously daring in his choice of words.”
February 8
Humor

107.
The truth of a proposition has nothing to do with its credibility. And vice versa.
~Robert A. Heinlein, Time Enough for Love (1973)

108.
Computer games don’t affect kids, I mean if Pac Man affected us as kids, we’d all be running around in darkened rooms, munching pills and listening to repetitive music.
~Marcus Brigstocke (falsely attributed to Kristian Wilson, Nintendo Inc.)

108.
Some people insist that “mediocre” is better than “best.” They delight in clipping wings because they themselves can’t fly. They despise brains because they have none. Pfah!
~Robert A. Heinlein, Have Space Suit—Will Travel (1958)
February 9
Physicists

110.
The important thing in science is not so much to obtain new facts as to discover new ways of thinking about them.
~Sir William Bragg. Sir William Henry Bragg (1862 – 1942) was a British physicist, chemist, mathematician and active sportsman who uniquely shared a Nobel Prize with his son William Lawrence Bragg − the 1915 Nobel Prize in Physics.

111.
We must not forget that when radium was discovered no one knew that it would prove useful in hospitals. The work was one of pure science. And this is a proof that scientific work must not be considered from the point of view of the direct usefulness of it. It must be done for itself, for the beauty of science, and then there is always the chance that a scientific discovery may become like the radium a benefit for humanity.
~Marie Curie. Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867 – 1934) was a Polish physicist and chemist, working mainly in France, who is famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the only woman to win in two fields, and the only person to win in multiple sciences. She was also the first female professor at the University of Paris (La Sorbonne), and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in Paris’ Panthéon.future 2mb

1001 Quotations®: The Future by Day Williams

January 30
Writers

81.
The radical novelty of modern science lies precisely in the rejection of the belief, which is at the heart of all popular religion, that the forces which move the stars and atoms are contingent upon the preferences of the human heart.
~Walter Lippmann

82.
Science, in the very act of solving problems, creates more of them.
~Abraham Flexner, Universities, 1930

83.
I will accept the rules that you feel necessary to your freedom. I am free, no matter what rules surround me. If I find them tolerable, I tolerate them; if I find them too obnoxious, I break them. I am free because I know that I alone am morally responsible for everything I do.
~Robert A. Heinlein, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress (1966)
January 31
Futurists

84.
Nanotechnology will let us build computers that are incredibly powerful. We’ll have more power in the volume of a sugar cube than exists in the entire world today.
~Ralph Merkle

85.
We believe that nanotechnology will have a transformative effect on cancer diagnosis and treatment. In fact, its impact is already visible in the research being conducted through many of the centers we are announcing today. Through the applications of nanotechnology, we will increase the rate of progress towards eliminating the suffering and death due to cancer.
~Andrew Eschenbach
February 1
Holy Bible

86.
I told them, “If you think it best, give me my pay; but if not, keep it.” So they paid me thirty pieces of silver.
And the LORD said to me, “Throw it to the potter”−the handsome price at which they priced me! So I took the thirty pieces of silver and threw them into the house of the LORD to the potter.
~Zechariah 11:12-13

87.
I offered my back to those who beat me, my cheeks to those who pulled out my beard; I did not hide my face from mocking and spitting.
~Isaiah 50:6

88.
He was oppressed and afflicted, yet he did not open his mouth; he was led like a lamb to the slaughter, and as a sheep before her shearers is silent, so he did not open his mouth.
Isaiah 53:7
February 2
Science Fiction Writers

89.
I want to stay as close to the edge as I can without going over. Out on the edge you see all kinds of things you can’t see from the center.
~Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. (1922 – 2007), American novelist known for works blending satire, black comedy, and science fiction.

90.
The human race, to which so many of my readers belong, has been playing at children’s games from the beginning, and will probably do it till the end, which is a nuisance for the few people who grow up. And one of the games to which it is most attached is called “Keep to-morrow dark,” and which is also named (by the rustics in Shropshire, I have no doubt) “Cheat the Prophet.” The players listen very carefully and respectfully to all that the clever men have to say about what is to happen in the next generation. They players then wait until all the clever men are dead, and bury them nicely. Then they go and do something else. That is all. For a race of simple tastes, however, it is great fun.
~G. K. Chesterton, The Napoleon of Notting Hill (1904)

91.
The younger lamas are naturally preoccupied with the past; it is a necessary step to envisaging the future.
~James Hilton, Lost Horizon (1933)

91.
This was a Golden Age, a time of high adventure, rich living, and hard dying . . . but nobody thought so. This was a future of fortune and theft, pillage and rapine, culture and vice . . . but nobody admitted it.
~Alfred Bester, The Stars My Destination (1956)
February 3
Robots and UFOs

92.
We are survival machines −robot vehicles blindly programmed to preserve the selfish molecules known as genes.
~Richard Dawkins, The Selfish Gene

93.
Man is a robot with defects.
~Emile Cioran, The Trouble With Being Born

94.
Nature (the art whereby God hath made and governs the world) is by the art of man, as in many other things, so in this also imitated, that it can make an Artificial Animal. For seeing life is . . . but a motion of Limbs, the beginning whereof is in some principal part within; why may we not say, that all Automata (Engines that move themselves by springs and wheels as doth a watch) have an artificial life? For what is the Heart, but a Spring; and the Nerves, but so many Strings; and the Joints, but so many Wheels, giving motion to the whole Body, such as was intended by the Artificer? Art goes yet further, imitating that rational and most excellent work of Nature, Man.
~Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan
February 4
Change

95.
All things must change
To something new, to something strange.
~Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Kéramos (1878), line 32. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (1807 – 1882) was an American poet and one of the five members of the group known as the Fireside Poets.

96.
But the nearer the dawn the darker the night,
And by going wrong all things come right;
Things have been mended that were worse,
And the worse, the nearer they are to mend.
~Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Tales of a Wayside Inn (1863−1874), “The Baron of St. Castine,” line 265.

97.
Do not think that years leave us and find us the same!
~Owen Meredith (Lord Lytton), Lucile (1860), Part II, Canto II, Stanza 3.
February 5
Physicists

98.
In any field, find the strangest thing and then explore it.
~John Archibald Wheeler

99.
The questions worth asking, in other words, come not from other people but from nature, and are for the most part delicate things easily drowned out by the noise of everyday life.
~Robert B. Laughlin

100.
Behind it all is surely an idea so simple, so beautiful, that when we grasp it − in a decade, a century, or a millennium − we will all say to each other, how could it have been otherwise? How could we have been so stupid?
~John Archibald Wheeler. John Archibald Wheeler (1911 – 2008) was an eminent American theoretical physicist. One of the later collaborators of Albert Einstein, he tried to achieve Einstein’s vision of a unified field theory. He is also known for having coined the terms “black hole” and “wormhole” and the phrase “it from bit.”

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1001 Quotations®: The Future by Day Williams

62.
I am saying that all predictions concerning climate are highly uncertain.
~Freeman Dyson
January 22
Humor

63.
There is no adequate defense, except stupidity, against the impact of a new idea.
~Percy Williams Bridgman, United States physicist

64.
Whoever undertakes to set himself up as a judge in the field of Truth and Knowledge is shipwrecked by the laughter of the gods.
~Albert Einstein
January 23
Songs and Poems

65.
Tempora mutantur.
The times change, and we change with them.
English variant of traditional Latin:
Tempora mutantur nos et mutamur in illis.
~Quoted (as “proverbial”) in William Harrison‘s Description of England, 1577, p. 170, part of Holinshed‘s Chronicles

66.
Because things are the way they are, things will not stay the way they are.
~Bertolt Brecht, as quoted in Dictionary of Contemporary Quotations (1976) by John Gordon Burke and Ned Kehde, p. 224, also in The Book of Positive Quotations (2007) by John Cook, p. 390.

67.
Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose.
The more things change, the more they are the same.
~Alphonse Karr, Les Guêpes, January 1849, vi
January 24
Presidents

68.
The only limit to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today. Let us move forward with strong and active faith.
~Franklin Delano Roosevelt

69.
We cannot always build the future for our youth, but we can build our youth for the future.
~Franklin Delano Roosevelt

70.
The goal to strive for is a poor government but a rich people.
~Andrew Johnson (1865–1869)
January 25
Physicists

71.
I don’t think of myself predicting things. I’m expressing possibilities. Things that could happen. To a large extent it’s a question of how badly people want them to.
~Freeman Dyson. Freeman John Dyson FRS (b. 1923) is a British-born American theoretical physicist and mathematician, famous for his work in quantum electrodynamics, solid-state physics, astronomy and nuclear engineering. Dyson is a member of the Board of Sponsors of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. For over fifty years he has lived in Princeton, New Jersey.

72.
It has become part of the accepted wisdom to say that the twentieth century was the century of physics and the twenty-first century will be the century of biology.
~Freeman Dyson
January 26
Humor

73.
I’m not dumb. I just have a command of thoroughly useless information.
~Calvin, of Calvin and Hobbes

74.
Kirk: What would you say the odds are on our getting out of here?
Spock: Difficult to be precise, Captain. I should say approximately seven thousand eight hundred twenty four point seven to one.
Kirk: Difficult to be precise? Seven thousand eight hundred and twenty four to one?
Spock: Seven thousand eight hundred twenty four point seven to one.
Kirk: That’s a pretty close approximation.
Spock: I endeavour to be accurate.
Kirk: You do quite well.
~Star Trek: The Original Series, “Errand of Mercy“
January 27
Inventors and Discoverers

75.
So we went to Atari and said, “Hey, we’ve got this amazing thing, even built with some of your parts, and what do you think about funding us? Or we’ll give it to you. We just want to do it. Pay our salary, we’ll come work for you.” And they said, “No.” So then we went to Hewlett-Packard, and they said, “Hey, we don’t need you. You haven’t got through college yet.”
~Steve Jobs, cofounder of Apple Computer

76.
I was elated, ecstatic and extremely surprised that we were successful.
~Neil Armstrong (b. 1930), American Astronaut, the first man to set foot on the moon.
January 28
Computers and Software

77.
Indeed, it would not be an exaggeration to describe the history of the computer industry for the past decade as a massive effort to keep up with Apple.
~Byte, December 1994

78.
Interviewer: Is studying computer science the best way to prepare to be a programmer?
Bill Gates: No. the best way to prepare is to write programs, and
to study great programs that other people have written. In my case, I went to the garbage cans at the Computer Science Center and I fished out listings of their operating system. You got to be willing to read other people’s code, then write your own, then have other people review your code. You’ve got to want to be in this incredible feedback loop where you get the world-class people to tell you what you’re doing wrong.
~Bill Gates cited in: “Programmers at Work: Interviews with 19
Programmers Who Shaped the Computer Industry,” Tempus, by Susan Lammers (Editor).
January 29
Leaders

79.
The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.
~Eleanor Roosevelt, It Seems to Me: Selected Letters of Eleanor Roosevelt

80.
The signs of outstanding leadership appear primarily among the followers.
Are the followers reaching their potential? Are they learning? Serving? Do they achieve the required results? Do they change with grace? Manage conflict?
~Max De Pree
January 30
Writers

81.
The radical novelty of modern science lies precisely in the rejection of the belief, which is at the heart of all popular religion, that the forces which move the stars and atoms are contingent upon the preferences of the human heart.
~Walter Lippmann

 

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1001 Quotations®: The Future by Day Williams

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January 16
War and Peace

43.
The weapons were conceived and created by a small band of physicists and chemists; they remain a cataclysmic threat to the whole of human society and the natural environment.
~Barry Commoner

44.
In an incredible perversion of justice, former soldiers who sprayed festeringly
poisonous chemicals on Vietnam, and now find today that they themselves have been
damaged by them, appeal to the people for sympathy and charity. The effects of the
defoliant “Agent Orange” are discussed at length, but not one single newspaper article or
hearing that we are aware of has even mentioned the effects of the people who still live in
those regions of Vietnam. It’s as outlandish as if Nazis who gassed Jews were now to
come forward and whine that the poisons they utilized had finally made them sick. The
staggering monstrousness goes unlaughed at and even unnoticed, as in a Kafka novel.
~Fred Woodworth, The Match, No. 79

45.
The unformulated message of an assembly of news items from every quarter of the globe is that the world today is one city. All war is civil war. All suffering is our own.
~Marshall McLuhan, “Key Quotations from the Writings of Marshall McLuhan“, assembled by William Kuhns, from Essential McLuhan (1995), edited by Eric McLuhan and Frank Zingrone.
January 17
Holy Bible

46.
Rejoice greatly, O Daughter of Zion! Shout, Daughter of Jerusalem! See, your king comes to you, righteous and having salvation, gentle and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey.
~Zechariah 9:9

47.
“Sir,” the woman said, “I can see that you are a prophet. Our fathers worshiped on this mountain, but you Jews claim that the place where we must worship is in Jerusalem.”
Jesus declared, “Believe me, woman, a time is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem. You Samaritans worship what you do not know; we worship what we do know, for salvation is from the Jews. Yet a time is coming and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the Father in spirit and truth, for they are the kind of worshipers the Father seeks. God is spirit, and his worshipers must worship in spirit and in truth.”
The woman said, “I know that Messiah“ (called Christ) “is coming. When he comes, he will explain everything to us.”
Then Jesus declared, “I who speak to you am he.”
~John 4:19-26

48.
For to us a child is born, to us a son is given, and the government will be on his shoulders. And he will be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Of the increase of his government and peace there will be no end. He will reign on David’s throne and over his kingdom, establishing and upholding it with justice and righteousness from that time on and forever. The zeal of the LORD Almighty will accomplish this.
~Isaiah 9:6-7
January 18
Science Fiction Writers

49.
“Who controls the past,” ran the Party slogan, “controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.”
~George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)

50.
If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face—for ever.
~George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four (1949)

51.
In her ruddy face, surprised pleasure fought with a worry that saw the future as a suddenly treacherous thing, full of trials.
~Raymond Z. Gallun, “Prodigal’s Aura“ (1951)
January 19
Robots and UFOs

52.
I visualize a time when we will be to robots what dogs are to humans, and I’m rooting for the machines.
~Claude Shannon, The Mathematical Theory of Communication

53.
Let’s start with the three fundamental Rules of Robotics. We have: one, a robot may not injure a human being, or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm. Two, a robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law. And three, a robot must protect its own existence as
long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Laws.
~Isaac Asimov, Astounding Science Fiction, Mar. 1942

54.
The danger of the future is that men may become robots. True enough, robots do not rebel. But given man’s nature, robots cannot live and remain sane, they become “Golems.” They will destroy their world and themselves because they cannot stand any longer the boredom of a meaningless life.
~Erich Fromm, The Sane Society
January 20
Change

55.
While people are engaged in creating a totally different world, they always form vivid images of the preceding world.
~Marshall McLuhan, The Book of Probes : Marshall McLuhan, designed by David Carson, edited by Marshall McLuhan project, W. Terrance Gordon, Eric McLuhan, Philip B. Meggs, p. 21.

56.
Any new technology is an evolutionary and biological mutation opening doors of perception and new spheres of action to mankind.
~Marshall McLuhan, The Book of Probes : Marshall McLuhan, designed by David Carson, edited by Marshall McLuhan project, W. Terrance Gordon, Eric McLuhan, Philip B. Meggs, p. 67.

57.
Q: Do you feel a need to be distinctive and mass-produced? Q: Are you in the groove? That is, are you moving in ever-diminishing circles? Q: How often do you change your mind, your politics, your clothes?
~Marshall McLuhan, The Book of Probes : Marshall McLuhan, designed by David Carson, edited by Marshall McLuhan project, W. Terrance Gordon, Eric McLuhan, Philip B. Meggs, pp. 121-125.

58.
When you move into a new area, a new territory and learn a new language, the language is not a new subject, it is an environment, it is total.
~Marshall McLuhan, The Book of Probes : Marshall McLuhan, designed by David Carson, edited by Marshall McLuhan project, W. Terrance Gordon, Eric McLuhan, Philip B. Meggs, p. 105.

59.
School is the advertising agency which makes you believe you need the society as it is.
~Marshall McLuhan, The Book of Probes : Marshall McLuhan, designed by David Carson, edited by Marshall McLuhan project, W. Terrance Gordon, Eric McLuhan, Philip B. Meggs, p. 147.
January 21
Physicists

60.
We are at the very beginning of time for the human race. It is not unreasonable that we grapple with problems. But there are tens of thousands of years in the future. Our responsibility is to do what we can, learn what we can, improve the solutions, and pass them on.
~Richard P. Feynman

61.
The technologies which have had the most profound effects on human life are usually simple.
~Freeman Dyson

62.
I am saying that all predictions concerning climate are highly uncertain.
~Freeman Dyson